Gaelic League

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gaelic League

 

an organization of the Irish bourgeois intelligentsia. It was founded July 31, 1893. Its established goal was to revive the Gaelic language and to replace English culture in Ireland with Irish-Celtic culture. It promoted the development of the national literature, music, and theater. Its activities were especially intensified in the early 20th century when its influence had also spread among the Irish living in other countries. It contributed to the creation of the National University of Ireland (1909) with departments of Celtic archaeology, the history of Ireland, the Irish language, and Irish literature. The activities of the Gaelic League reflected to a certain extent the protest of the popular masses against the national oppression of Ireland, but on the whole, it was far removed from the real goals of the liberation struggle.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the course of five decades, O'Faolain sparred with the Board of Literary Censors, the Gaelic League, and the Catholic hierarchy, among others, and his writing career provides a cultural topography of postindependence Ireland in a way that few literary histories can achieve.
Similarly the Gaelic League, founded in 1893, was a vehicle to promote the Irish language and culture and saw its membership reach 100,000 by 1906.
All Dressed Up traces the lineage of Celtic and Christian pageantry from the Gaelic League and Pearse's puritanical idolatry of Ulster Cycle heroes, to the Aonach Tailteann and the Dublin Civic Weeks of 1927 and 1929, to the 1932 Eucharistic Congress, to Micheal MacLiammoir and Hilton Edwards' ambitious productions for the Tostal festivals of the 1950s.
First a rigorous historian, and second (if not equally) an impressive fiddler, Dowling is well placed to deal meticulously with both the macro and the micro, most freshly here with 'Music in the Revival', which takes in uilleann piping and the language body, the Gaelic League. If Professor John A.
In 1951 Ernest Blythe, the finance minister of the Irish government, wrote: "When I joined the Gaelic League and began to learn Irish, one of my fellow members told me, almost with bated breath, that the Welsh community in Dublin had its own church in which services were conducted in Welsh.
O Siadhail theorizes that her views began to shift even before the Irish visit, as Hughes met members of the Gaelic League and other Irish expatriate organizations in the British capital.
Irish language classes were organised and a branch of Conradh na Gaeilge (The Gaelic League) was set up in the camp to promote the language.
The aim of the event was to encourage new players to sign up before the start of the first round of the Middle East Gaelic League in Bahrain on October 24.Tom Hanratty, the Arabian Celts team manager and coach, said: "We are always on the lookout for new players, particularly at the start of a new season.
According to Antoinette Quinn, although the Gaelic League was more willing to allow female membership, the patriarchal ideology imposed upon Irish women time and again manifested itself.
The purpose of this essay is to examine the utopian impulses and constructions within the Irish-language social movement known as the Gaelic League, a movement that formed the nucleus of mass Irish cultural nationalism at the fin de siecle.
Horgan appreciated the significance of Parnell, the Gaelic League, Sinn Fein, the Volunteer movement and the 1916 rising.
The volume is not particularly clear as to the dates of the various materials, but they address such topics as the signing of the Truce of July of 1921, the meaning of the Rising of 1916, criticism of the Government of Ireland Act of 1920 (which Collins and other nationalists dubbed the "Partition Act"), the national culture of Ireland, Ireland's resources to be developed upon independence, and the roles of the Gaelic League and Sinn Fein in the struggle for Irish independence.