Gaels

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Gaels

 

Goidels, a group of ancient Celtic tribes who settled in Ireland in the fourth century B.C. By mixing with the native pre-Indo-European population, the Gaels began the formation of the Irish people. In the fifth to the sixth century A.D. part of the Gaels migrated to Scotland, where they took part along with the Picts in the formation of the Scottish nationality. The name “Gaels” is still used for the ethnic group that inhabits the mountainous regions of northern Scotland and the Hebrides Islands. Their population is about 100,000 (1970, estimate). Present-day Gaels ordinarily speak Gaelic (Scottish Gaelic), but almost all of them know English as well. The most common religious affiliations are Presbyterian and Catholic. The principal occupation is the raising of livestock.

REFERENCE

Narody zarubezhnoi Evropy, vol. 2. Moscow, 1965.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arts & CULTURE AWARD For the most outstanding contribution to Gaelic culture. The award can cover literature, poetry, music, visual art, drama, film or television.
The group are now looking forward to the possibility of working with their fellow contestants in the future and using their voices to promote Gaelic culture.
Discover Gaelic culture, history and spectacular landscapes on the main island of the Outer Hebrides.
Stirling will celebrate Gaelic culture this weekend with the annual Provincial Mod.
Perhaps more attention could have been paid to the riches of Scottish Gaelic culture, especially given the emphasis on cultural difference.
Chairman, Grant McFarlane, says that Festival 2018 is giving young musicians the opportunity to create a vibrant showcase of traditional Scottish and Gaelic culture.
Their chairman, Grant McFarlane, says that Festival 2018 is giving young musicians the opportunity to create a vibrant showcase of traditional Scottish and Gaelic culture.
Smith's tendency to do this, skirting at times the edges of lampooning aspects of Gaelic culture, was perhaps not always entirely welcome, although evidently not as challenging or subversive as the ways in which his elder peer Sorley Maclean revolutionised Gaelic literature.
"Connolly regarded that Gaelic culture was ideally suited to socialism ...' the Gael reached the highest point of civilization and culture in Europe.'"
In addition, there is the unique Gaelic culture of the Western Isles to enjoy and a wealth of archaeology, including Neolithic and Bronze Age remains, ruined forts and castles and monuments commemorating Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Highland Land Struggle.