Gagarin, Pavel Pavlovich

Gagarin, Pavel Pavlovich

 

Born Mar. 4 (15), 1789, in Moscow; died Feb. 21 (Mar. 4), 1872, in St. Petersburg. Prince, Russian statesman, and big landlord.

Gagarin became a senator in 1831 and a member of the State Council in 1844. In 1849 he was on the Secret Commission when it investigated the case of the Petrashevtsy. While a member of the Secret Committee and then of the Main Committee for Peasant Affairs (1857-61), he held an extremely reactionary position on the peasant question. Upon Gagarin’s proposal, the State Council adopted the article on the so-called darstvennyi nadel, which still further reduced the peasants’ land tenure. In 1864, Gagarin became chairman of the Committee of Ministers. In 1866 he was chairman of the Supreme Criminal Court in the D. V. Karakozov case.

References in classic literature ?
And you know how desperate hard it's got to be to get hired help.
As my time drew nearer, and there got to be talk of my having a new coat for the ceremony, my mind began to misgive me.
He likes to talk to me, though he's a highly eddicated man and I'm only an ignorant old sailor, because he's one of the folks that's GOT to talk or they're miserable, and he finds listeners scarce around here.
Number four, I just got to get acquainted with you, and I just got to get you to see that I mean fair and all right.
Now, a nigger, you see, what's got to be hacked and tumbled round the world, and sold to Tom, and Dick, and the Lord knows who, 'tan't no kindness to be givin' on him notions and expectations, and bringin' on him up too well, for the rough and tumble comes all the harder on him arter.
I would sometimes say to them, I wished I could be as free as they would be when they got to be men.
I'll tell you what it is, boys we haven't been half good enough to Rose, and we've got to make it up to her somehow," said Archie, who had a very manly sense of honour about paying his debts, even to a girl.
Body number three, wrote leaden little books for them, showing how the good grown-up baby invariably got to the Savings-bank, and the bad grown-up baby invariably got transported.
And when it had got to the worst, and it seemed to me that I could not stand anything more, a fly got in through the bars and settled on my nose, and the bars were stuck and wouldn't work, and I couldn't get the visor up; and I could only shake my head, which was baking hot by this time, and the fly -- well, you know how a fly acts when he has got a certainty -- he only minded the shaking enough to change from nose to lip, and lip to ear, and buzz and buzz all around in there, and keep on lighting and biting, in a way that a person, already so distressed as I was, simply could not stand.
And he said that handling a snake- skin was such awful bad luck that maybe we hadn't got to the end of it yet.
Now," said Joe, getting up, "you got to let me kill YOU.
Tom, I reckon you've got to pack up and go down to Arkansaw--your aunt Sally wants you.