Gaia hypothesis

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Related to Gaia Theory: deep ecology

Gaia hypothesis

an hypothesis developed by the British scientist, James Lovelock, to suggest that the earth is one living system, such that the distinction between organic and inorganic matter is false. Gaia was an ancient Greek goddess of the earth and fertility Contrary to established scientific notions, Lovelock argues that a conducive physical environment did not first exist within which living organisms could develop, but rather the living organisms create the necessary physical environment for their survival. This leads to the concept of the planet earth as a CYBERNETIC system. In the late 1980s, the Gaia movement emerged as one of the environmental groups increasingly influential in national and international politics.
References in periodicals archive ?
She builds her ecological theology on the scientific Gaia theory; yet, (320) like any other theory, Gaia theory is a hypothesis.
Lotka was not only one of Vernadskij's contemporary born in the current Ukraine where Vernadskij set up his laboratory in Kiev, but also the foremost source for the Gaia theory, as Lovelock acknowledged.
With essay titles such as, Population Growth, Gaia Theory, Migration, Oceans and Seas, Plant and Animal Domestication, Diseases, Creation Myths, Climate Change, Carrying Capacity, and Anthroposphere, it is obvious that the editors have chosen the essential themes of Big History.
The Gaia hypothesis, also known as Gaia theory or Gaia principle, proposes that all organisms and their inorganic surroundings on Earth are closely integrated to form a single and self- regulating complex system, maintaining the conditions for life on the planet.
I HAVE written before about my confusion over the the climate change debate and I've seen some excellent coverage of the problems involved in The Journal, but now, to my dismay, one of the people who I have been influenced by over the years, James Lovelock, the originator of the Gaia Theory, has now changed most of his predictions and quite a few of his attitudes.
Topics include biological exchanges, carrying capacity, climate change, Columbian exchange, deforestation, desertification, diseases in plants and animals, ecological imperialism energy, environmental movements, extinction, famine, Gaia theory, green revolution, salinization, water management, and wind energy, among others.
Newly published work done at the University of Maryland by first author Harry Oduro, together with UMD geochemist James Farquhar and marine biologist Kathryn Van Alstyne of Western Washington University, provides a tool for tracing and measuring the movement of sulphur through ocean organisms, the atmosphere and the land in ways that may help prove or disprove the controversial Gaia theory.
Newly published work done at the University of Maryland by first author Harry Oduro, together with UMD geochemist James Farquhar and marine biologist Kathryn Van Alstyne of Western Washington University, provides a tool for tracing and measuring the movement of sulfur through ocean organisms, the atmosphere and the land in ways that may help prove or disprove the controversial Gaia theory. Their study appears in this week's Online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
Davies is a zoologist and children's writer, and James Lovelock, a scientist and the creator of Gaia theory, presents a stark afterword in the book's third and final section.
James Lovelock (best known for his Gaia theory) and Chris Rapley (director of the British Science Museum) have been talking with billionaire Richard Branson about funding an experiment to re-jigger marine ecosystems to counter climate change.
He said he had been influenced by James Lovelock, the inventor of Gaia Theory, which suggests that the world may already have crossed a "tipping point".