Galatia


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Galatia

(gəlā`shə) [Gr.,=Gaul], ancient territory of central Asia Minor, in present Turkey (around modern Ankara). It was so called from its inhabitants, the Gauls, who invaded from the west and conquered it in the 3d cent. B.C. The name applies to the Gallic territory that was originally composed of parts of Phrygia and Cappadocia. Attalus I checked (230 B.C.) the advance of the Gauls and reduced the size of Galatia. The region was subjected (189 B.C.) by the Romans. The name was also used for the Roman province, formed in 25 B.C. At first the Roman province was much larger than old Galatia, but it was reduced (A.D. 72) to a smaller scope.
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Galatia

an ancient region in central Asia Minor, conquered by Gauls 278--277 bc: later a Roman province
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Because No.6 coal does not meet Phase 1 compliance standards, Galatia was forced to cease mining in it in July last year, leaving some 155 Mt of mineable coal in the ground.
Snyder argues that Paul introduced the Jesus tradition to the Celts in Galatia, that it moved from there to Spain and from Spain to Ireland (see p.
It begins about 35 kilometers north of Ctesiphon, and proceeds more than 1,700 kilometers to Dadastana on the border between Galatia and Bithynia, between June 363 CE and February 364 CE.
They are not Jewish Christians from outside; rather, Paul's converts to Christ in Galatia, members of an early Judaic Christianity, were being wooed by non-Christian Jews in local synagogues.
* Kelly and Garison Stanley of Galatia, a son, Sonny; grandparents Melvin Donoho of Salem, the late Frances Donoho-Witges, Darrell Stanley of Harrisburg and the late Phyllis Stanley
(8) It is the juridical principle of fidei commissum, an undertaking by trust adopted from ancient Greek law; and, because of its pervasive appropriation throughout the Mediterranean world, it would be intelligible not only to the Christians at Rome but also to Christians in the Roman province of Galatia. (9)