Galatia

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Galatia

(gəlā`shə) [Gr.,=Gaul], ancient territory of central Asia Minor, in present Turkey (around modern Ankara). It was so called from its inhabitants, the Gauls, who invaded from the west and conquered it in the 3d cent. B.C. The name applies to the Gallic territory that was originally composed of parts of Phrygia and Cappadocia. Attalus I checked (230 B.C.) the advance of the Gauls and reduced the size of Galatia. The region was subjected (189 B.C.) by the Romans. The name was also used for the Roman province, formed in 25 B.C. At first the Roman province was much larger than old Galatia, but it was reduced (A.D. 72) to a smaller scope.
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Galatia

an ancient region in central Asia Minor, conquered by Gauls 278--277 bc: later a Roman province
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Between these two alternatives, the Galatians are hesitating.
In Schussler Fiorenza's view, Galatians 3:28 is the "magna carta of Christian Feminism."(9)
This certainly represents the case in Galatians. Unnamed "Judaizers" (Galatians 2:14) had effectively undermined Paul's Gospel about the death, resurrection and embodiment of the Spirit of the Risen One in the community by an overstress on the law.
Relating Galatians to Christian life today for faithful Catholics, this study is supplemented by features specifically designed to help pastoral ministers, lay readers, and New Testament students understand the Bible more deeply and use it more effectively.
In a revision of his 2018 PhD dissertation at McMaster Divinity College, Yoon outlines discourse analysis from the framework of systemic functional linguistics for analyzing Paul's letter to the Galatians. His goal is to determine whether the context of situation better reflects the New Perspective on Paul, covenantal nomism, or the more traditional perspective of legalism.
In advance of the conversation, I meditated on the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22-23) and discovered that as I let the words "love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control" replay in my mind, calmness settled in.
Galatians and Romans may be more different than she allows; Paul certainly could have changed his mind or tone on certain issues over the course of his epistolary career.
The Reformers, of course, were drawn to Galatians above all by Paul's formulation of the doctrine of justification by faith, a doctrine to which they appealed as a soteriological corrective.
If some chose to read into it what they wanted they either have never read Galatians Chapter 6 or have misread it.
The Augustus Temple was built after Roman Emperor Augustus annexed the lands of the Galatians and Ancyra (Ankara) to the Roman Empire in the year 25 B.C.
wades into the controverted waters of what Paul means by stoicheia, the "elemental spirits," in Galatians (4:3,9).