Galaxy Evolution Explorer


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Galaxy Evolution Explorer

(GALEX) A NASA ultraviolet space telescope launched into a nearly circular orbit Apr. 2003 for the purpose of observing ultraviolet radiation from a range of galaxies, both near and remote, in order to advance our knowledge of the evolution and history of galaxies and of star formation. In a 29-month mission supervised by the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), GALEX carried out an extragalactic all-sky survey to produce the first comprehensive map of the Universe showing galaxies evolving. To accomplish this, the observatory looked back in time to an era when the Universe was only 20% of its present age. The UV radiation from such remote regions is redshifted into the visible and near infrared, and the telescope made provision for this. By making a fair comparison between the remote galaxies observed at such an early period with ones close to us in both space and time, GALEX helped provide a means of assessing what changes have occurred between then and now so that cosmologists can learn when and where the stars and elements found today had their origins. GALEX was also tasked with identifying celestial objects for further investigation by current and future missions and producing an all-embracing publicly available archive of data.

The GALEX satellite weighed 280 kg. Its telescope was equipped with f/6 Richey-Chrétien optics. Its 50-cm-diameter primary mirror and 22-cm-diameter secondary mirror were especially coated to screen out local background radiation, and its observations were made only while it was in the Earth's shadow. The mirrors focused incoming light onto two 65-mm microchannel plate detectors with a total ultraviolet sensitivity range of 135–280 nm. The GALEX telescope produced wide-field circular images of sky measuring 1.2° in diameter at a resolution of 5 arcseconds in the far and near ultraviolet light bands. Spectra with 10 to 20 angstrom resolution for all objects within the field of view were obtained by placing a crystalline prism in the light path.

References in periodicals archive ?
Recorded by the orbiting observatory known as the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), the images show that about 20 percent of spiral galaxies appear to harbor clusters of newborn stars in the galactic equivalent of Siberia.
The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) is a NASA space ultraviolet Small Explorer mission that will map the global history and probe the causes of star formation over 80 percent of the life of the Universe.
The recently decommissioned Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite produced one of the greatest M31 portraits, combining far- and near-ultraviolet imaging (S&T: April 2012, page 20).
Missions such as NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) observatory, which operated from 2003 to 2013, provided significant knowledge of star formation in nearby galaxies.
NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer, a space-based observatory, and the Pan-STARRS1 telescope on the summit of Haleakala in Hawaii were among the first to help identify the stellar remains.
5-meter ultraviolet telescope on the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite, which was launched in 2003.
Although the Pegasus vehicle had experienced several prior failures, it was the only option, because its payload, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite, was a small Explorer-class NASA mission with a hard cost cap of $100 million--a bargain in our era of billion-dollar space telescopes.
Washington, May 20 (ANI): Scientists using data from NASA's space-based Galaxy Evolution Explorer have found that dark energy was driving the universe apart at accelerating speeds.
Late last month, NASA released the first images taken by the recently launched Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite.
Infrared observations with NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and ultraviolet observations with NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) have allowed estimates of the rate of star formation in the ring.
Christopher Martin (Caltech) and his colleagues spotted signs of Mira's tail while inspecting images from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite, which is mapping the far-ultraviolet sky.
Using wide-field images recorded by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite, Morgenthaler produced extremely high-quality radial profiles of atomic carbon emissions from comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz).