Galician


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Galician

the Romance language or dialect of Spanish Galicia, sometimes regarded as a dialect of Spanish, although historically it is more closely related to Portuguese

Galician

 

the language of the Galicians, spoken in the northwestern part of the Iberian Peninsula. Approximately 2.6 million persons speak Galician (1967, estimate).

References in periodicals archive ?
In 1876 and 1877 the "German Liberals" still had a majority in parliament, but the debate on the "Galician law" illustrates how weak their position already was.
Rodriguez Garcia has referred to this radical writer as "one of the most exciting feminist voices in contemporary Galician literature," although he also observes that the "experimental freedom" found in her poetry "often takes [the reader] to uncomfortable extremes" (2011, 106).
Galician (near side) wins the Betfair International Handicap; Elizabeth Hurley and Shane Warne present the winning trophy to John Ferguson, representing Galician's winning connections
Galician (galego) is a Romance language spoken in the northwest corner of the Iberian peninsula, of which Portuguese is the daughter language; it has been under severe pressure from Castilian.
Let us take, for example, Joam Airas, a bourgeois from Santiago, who was never Portuguese, but who belongs to "Portuguese literature" in all Lusitanian literary histories owing to the fact that in the national reconstruction of that time linguistic criteria (i.e., Galician Portuguese) prevails over criteria of origin.
"I think Galician humor is closer to Irish or British," says top director Angel de la Cruz.
Balbino's innocence and sense of justice make this work, according to many critics, a kind of "Galician Manifesto," and the first clear leftist approach to Galician problems and reality.
GALICIAN poet Chus Pato and Canadian poet/translator Erin Moure are guests of Bangor University at a series of events focused on minority languages, translation and poetry later this month.
In Arredor de si (1930), the Galician writer Ramon Otero Pedrayo enables an intercultural dialogue between his own interpretation of Spanish cultural distinctiveness and the centripetal associations of two of the most representative novels of the philosophy and fiction of the Generation of 1898.
Mansilla + Tunon's new community centre for the Galician town of Lalin combines a range of municipal functions, from town hall and social work offices, to a library and exhibition space.
Moving to the Galician port city of Vigo in 1959, he returned to business in order to support his family and, notwithstanding a few exhibitions in the early '6os, soon gave up photography altogether.
Only three of the fifteen articles deal with Catalan or Aragonese topics; the rest address mainly Castilian themes, with a few references to Galician subjects.