Galicians

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Galicians

 

Gallegos, a people making up most of the population of Galicia. There are approximately 2.6 million Galicians in Spain (1970, estimate). They speak Galician, or Gallego, a language related to Portuguese. Their religion is Roman Catholicism. The ancestors of the Galicians—celticized Gallaici tribes—were strongly influenced by the Romans (first century A.D.) and the Suevi (fifth and sixth centuries). The chief occupations of the Galicians are farming, cattle raising, and on the Atlantic coast, fishing. A shortage of land and national oppression have resulted in systematic emigration since the 18th century (more than half a million Galicians now reside in the countries of the Americas).

REFERENCE

Narody Zarubezhnoi Evropy, vol. 2. Moscow, 1965.
References in periodicals archive ?
First up, he's in the city of La Coruna, where he examines the Celtic roots of the Galician people, and even attempts to master the bagpipes, before meeting walkers on the pilgrims' trail to Santiago de Compostela.
Humor was included because it was one of the essential features of the Galician voice (in contrast to the declamatory tone of Castilian) and proof of the intellectual capacity of the Galician people. Humor was used as a criterion for distinguishing Galician from Castilian and was thus a legitimizing factor for contemporary literary discourse connecting it with the Middle Ages, the golden age of Galician civilization.
The Bravu artists proposed a journey into the hinterland, to the heart of rural life, even though rurality had actually fed the inferiority complex of the Galician people and contributed to their suppression and to a social stigma inherited from centuries of symbolic oppression inflicted by the Spanish state.
10 artistas gallegos en el exilio latinoamericano, held to call attention to the historic dispersion of the Galician people since the middle of the nineteenth century.
But above all, Sempre en Galiza is a meticulous analysis of the causes and the consequences of having suffered for years under the power and control of a government, Spain, that ignored the needs of the Galician people.
His total project is the walled precinct of the monastery, the principal edifice of which is the independently realised Museum of the Galician People. At the time of writing, minimal interventions to the enclosed cemetery and gardens (portals, paved thresholds, geometric planting) are almost complete with a site on the farthest hill awaiting a second Siza design.
At the performance a significant text was released in which it was affirmed that "one of the greatest forms of propaganda that we can use to extend the redemptive ideal of the Galician people and emphasize their racial personality is theatre" ("unha das mais grandes formas de propaganda que podemos utilizar para espallar o ideal redentor do pobo galego e afincar a propia personalidade racial, e o teatro" [pamphlet, n.p.; unless indicated otherwise, all translations are by Wiersma]).