gallstone

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gallstone:

see gall bladdergall bladder,
small pear-shaped sac that stores and concentrates bile. It is connected to the liver (which produces the bile) by the hepatic duct. When food containing fat reaches the small intestine, the hormone cholecystokinin is produced by cells in the intestinal wall and
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.

gallstone

[′gȯl‚stōn]
(pathology)
A nodule formed in the gallbladder or biliary tubes and composed of calcium, cholesterol, or bilirubin, or a combination of these.

gallstone

Pathol a small hard concretion of cholesterol, bile pigments, and lime salts, formed in the gall bladder or its ducts
References in periodicals archive ?
Which included all patients with ultrasonographically proven gall stone disease undergoing cholecystectomy in our hospital in our study.
IOSR-JDMS, 15(12), 34-37], concluding North Indian population has seven times higher risk of developing gall stones.
Morphological spectrum of gall stone disease in 1100 cholecystectomies in India.
Icterus may be present due to biliary obstruction or in gall stone pancreatitis.
Clinical or biochemical suspicion of present or past gall stone pancreatitis.
Acute pancreatitis secondary to gall stone still remains a challenge to clinicians despite achieving the highest standards of care in the present era.
LC being a commonly performed operation for gall stone disease is undergoing rapid improvement with the advent of newer technologies 11,12.
Keywords: Complications, Gall stone disease, Hospital stay, Laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
Table-I: Comparison of serum calcium, copper and iron levels between gall stone patients and age and gender matched controls.
6%), while gall stone was common risk factors for chronic pancreatitis that constituted 9 patients (47.
Objectives: To analyze the complications of first 400 laparoscopic cholecystectomies (LC) for patients with symptomatic gall stone disease at a tertiary care hospital.
Gall stone disease remains one of the most common medical problems requiring surgical intervention.