gallstone

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gallstone:

see gall bladdergall bladder,
small pear-shaped sac that stores and concentrates bile. It is connected to the liver (which produces the bile) by the hepatic duct. When food containing fat reaches the small intestine, the hormone cholecystokinin is produced by cells in the intestinal wall and
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.

gallstone

[′gȯl‚stōn]
(pathology)
A nodule formed in the gallbladder or biliary tubes and composed of calcium, cholesterol, or bilirubin, or a combination of these.

gallstone

Pathol a small hard concretion of cholesterol, bile pigments, and lime salts, formed in the gall bladder or its ducts
References in periodicals archive ?
Various studies from India show high prevalence of gall stones in India with varying prevalence noted from different part of country.
Most of the cases of eosinophilic cholecystitis which the author was seeing, were having gall stones, which was actually the motivating factor to do this study.
Gall stones were detected during an executive routine health check up in a 53-year-old healthy lady.
Spilled gall stones during laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a review of the literature.
My second thought was, if only there was a natural remedy to cure kidney stones and gall stones * or any other illness, so that patients have an alternative to expensive treatments.
Doctors at the time said he had suffered from chronic calculus cholecystitis - an inflammation of the gall bladder accompanied by gall stones - and a duodenal polyp.
He said: "The gall stones impact on my life and I live on pain killers.
In addition, bear gull bladder is a valuable commodity because of its use in traditional Chinese medicine as an assumed cure for rheumatism, poor eyesight and gall stones.
Gall stones (noun): It is a well-known medical fact that non-Jews, while not immune to gall stones, do not discuss gall stones, publicly or privately.
After being diagnosed with gall stones he was told by doctors he needed to have his gall bladder removed.
John Thudichum, physician and lecturer on pathological chemistry at St Thomas's Hospital, London, studied the chemical composition of gall stones and published a treatise on this subject.
Gall stones can now be removed with the gall bladder by laparoscopic surgery in over 90 per cent of patients presenting with this disorder.