Gallup poll

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Gallup Poll

a sampling by the American Institute of Public Opinion or its British counterpart of the views of a representative cross section of the population, used esp as a means of forecasting voting

Gallup poll

See GALLUP.

Gallup Poll

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A 1980 Gallup Poll revealed that 71 percent of Americans believe in an afterlife. A 2001 Gallup Poll showed that 38 percent believe it is possible to make contact with the dead; 54 percent believe in the effectiveness of spiritual healing; 42 percent believe in ghosts and hauntings.

References in periodicals archive ?
Learn more about how Gallup Poll Social Series works.
According to a Gallup Poll of 1,026 adults conducted Dec.
Several Gallup polls have been taken on behalf of Catholics Speak Out, based in Hyattsville, Md.
Still, only a minority of Catholics, 37 percent, said they "strongly agreed" that women should be ordained, according to a 1992 Gallup poll.
Washington, Aug 31 (ANI): A majority 51 percent of registered voters in America have said that they would vote for the GOP candidate in their district if the election were held today while 41 percent say they would support the Democrats, according to Gallup poll.
The Gallup poll released Friday also marks a massive shift from one year ago, when 50 percent of Americans called themselves pro-choice, and just 44 percent said they were pro-life.
The 2007 results are based on the five most recent Gallup Polls, spanning October, November, and early December.
For the last two years, most of Bush's approval ratings in the Gallup Poll have been below 40%.
This analysis involved an aggregation of the last four Gallup Polls in which the Republican trial heat was included -- conducted June 1-3, June 11-14, July 6-8, and July 12-16, 2007.
PRINCETON, NJ -- For the third national Gallup Poll in a row, Arizona Sen.
7-10 Gallup Poll, allowed respondents to name any candidate or political party, without prompting of specific names from Gallup interviewers.
That leaves only about 2% who say they plan to vote for a third-party candidate in November -- not much different from the 1% in Gallup Poll Daily tracking who typically volunteer that they will vote for someone other than Obama or McCain.