Galton


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Galton

Sir Francis. 1822--1911, English explorer and scientist, a cousin of Charles Darwin, noted for his researches in heredity, meteorology, and statistics. He founded the study of eugenics and the theory of anticyclones
References in periodicals archive ?
Galton distinguished between two methods in eugenics: positive and negative eugenics.
Mr Galton will be leaving the Welsh Government in August with an exit package based on a director general's salary.
The topics include Galton (1822-1911) and genius, photographing races from antiquity, peopling the Old Testament, Akhenaten's bloodline, Flinders Petrie (1853-1942) and Edwardian politics, and heads.
By 1903, Galton had become a preeminent scholar, who was most recognizably "scientific" and influential among advanced mathematicians and statisticians including Karl Pearson, W.
Beavan described Galton as a self-serving elitist who "treated with ingratitude and callousness both those who helped him win his prestige and those who through hard work had won acclaim of their own" (p.
Galton and Simpson, who had penned all of Hancock's television and radio series from the early Fifties onwards, came up with movie script The Day Off in 1961.
In a nutshell, this was what Galton called regression to the mean: the tendency of extreme values to move toward more common values.
In the beginning--that is, before Galton and Darwin--philosophers could write of natural traits being acquired through experience.
AWARD-WINNING speciality poultry producer, Gressingham Foods 01473 735456 and Michelin-starred chef Galton Blackiston, have joined forces to encourage more people to cook and eat duck.
Yet Novak takes a completely fresh approach to Galton's work by examining the visual and written records left by Galton and the man who spearheaded the creation of a photographic archive of Jewish types, Joseph Jacobs.
Galton Morrow is a prominent married Boston doctor with a thriving practice in the early 20th century.