game theory

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game theory

[′gām ‚thē·ə·rē]
(mathematics)
The mathematical study of games or abstract models of conflict situations from the viewpoint of determining an optimal policy or strategy. Also known as theory of games.

game theory

see THEORY OF GAMES.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anpalagan, "Distributed channel selection for interference mitigation in dynamic environment: A game-theoretic stochastic learning solution," IEEE Trans.
A Game-Theoretic Approach to Energy-Efficient Power Control in Multicarrier CDMA Systems ", IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, 24(6).
Presentation of game data in extensive and strategic forms (see next section) allows a combination of game-theoretic and, for larger strategy spaces, complex adaptive science techniques to analyze the games.
Game-theoretic simulations meant that coordination problems, situations in which an individual must choose between behavioral options knowing that other individuals are faced with the same choices and that the outcome will be determined by everyone's actions, could now be studied mathematically.
Doyle, "Contention control: A game-theoretic approach," in 46th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, New Orleans, LA, 2007, pp.
secret sharing, multi-party computation) have begun to be re-evaluated in a game-theoretic light (see [6, 18] for an overview of work in this direction).
Title of his thesis was 'Application of Game-Theoretic Techniques to Quantum Information Theory'.
In this paper, we shall apply a game-theoretic framework to a subset of contracts in the water industry.
Although the study explores only the qualitative aspects of game-theoretic analysis, it is of high value for three reasons: it points out the relationships between features of outsourcing management and game theory, provides recommendations to contract makers for higher efficiency, and it provides directions for future research.
The equilibrium-based category includes three groups, which are: the industry analysis approach associated with Michael Porter (1980), approaches based on the new industrial organization and game-theoretic reasoning in general (Tirole, 1988; Shapiro, 1989), and the resource-based perspective (Demsetz, 1973; Wernerfelt, 1984; Barney, 1986, 1991).
Most novels, after all, feature complex characters and motivations, and most novelists intuitively employ game-theoretic principles to the extent that such principles are part of all human beings' innate psychological equipment.
Kahn believes the concept of evil is necessary to understand the suicide bomber, and it certainly seems plausible to reject the game-theoretic approach.