gamma ray

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gamma ray

[′gam·ə ‚rā]
(nuclear physics)
A high-energy photon, especially as emitted by a nucleus in a transition between two energy levels.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study, the multiple gamma-ray detection capabilities of a cylindrical 76 mm x 76 mm (height x diameter) Ce:[Br.sub.3] detector has been tested through analysis of saline water samples containing 0.0-8.0wt% chlorine concentrations.
Based on their observations, LMC P3 was reclassified as a gamma-ray binary.
Lead researcher and Curtin research fellow Dr Paul Hancock said that after studying an ultra-sensitive image of gamma-ray bursts with no afterglow, we can now say the theory was incorrect and our telescopes have not failed us.
All in all, researchers will have a spacecraft capable of recording gamma-ray radiation over an energy range spanning seven orders of magnitude.
Now we can work to better understand how they manage this feat and determine if the process is common to all remnants where we see gamma-ray emission," said lead researcher Stefan Funk, an astrophysicist with the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University in Calif.
The gamma-ray emission originated about 70 light-years away from the galaxy's central black hole.
The system, first detected in 1966 as among the sky's strongest X-ray sources, was also one of the earliest claimed gamma-ray sources.
McClintock of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., suggest the gamma-ray signals may be coming not from the galactic center but from an unusual X-ray source known as GX1+4, in the same region of the sky.
In one, the expanding envelope of gas has broken up into fragments, allowing observers to detect gamma-ray emissions from both the front and the back of the gas cloud.
Astronomers first noticed the interference while observing gamma-rays from solar flares and other cosmic sources using the Solar Maximum Mission satellite.