gamma ray

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gamma ray

[′gam·ə ‚rā]
(nuclear physics)
A high-energy photon, especially as emitted by a nucleus in a transition between two energy levels.
References in periodicals archive ?
Before Fermi was launched, astronomers had expected to find a lot more gamma-ray binaries than they did.
A paper describing the discovery, titled "A luminous gamma-ray binary in the Large Magallanic Cloud," will be published in (http://iopscience.
Lead researcher and Curtin research fellow Dr Paul Hancock said that after studying an ultra-sensitive image of gamma-ray bursts with no afterglow, we can now say the theory was incorrect and our telescopes have not failed us.
Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the cosmos, thought to be triggered when the core of a massive star runs out of nuclear fuel, collapses under its own weight, and forms a black hole.
Now we can work to better understand how they manage this feat and determine if the process is common to all remnants where we see gamma-ray emission," said lead researcher Stefan Funk, an astrophysicist with the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University in Calif.
All in all, researchers will have a spacecraft capable of recording gamma-ray radiation over an energy range spanning seven orders of magnitude.
The gamma-ray emission originated about 70 light-years away from the galaxy's central black hole.
Efforts to confirm those observations helped spur the development of improved gamma-ray detectors, a legacy culminating in the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard Fermi.
suggest the gamma-ray signals may be coming not from the galactic center but from an unusual X-ray source known as GX1+4, in the same region of the sky.
This would allow observers to detect gamma-rays emitted from material traveling toward or away from the Earth.
Astronomers first noticed the interference while observing gamma-rays from solar flares and other cosmic sources using the Solar Maximum Mission satellite.
Bouvier's report focused on gamma-ray bursts, the ephemeral flashes of light that can signal the most powerful explosions in the universe since the Big Bang.