Ganelon


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Ganelon

the Judas among Charlemagne’s paladins. [Fr. Lit.: Song of Roland; LLEI, I: 286; Ital. Lit.: Inferno; Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Nun’s Priest’s Tale”]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
To have a bout of kicking at that traitor of a Ganelon he would have given his housekeeper, and his niece into the bargain.
Many of the stories that have captured the imagination of Palermo's mostly working class audiences over the centuries and which still survive today are from the repertoire of the Carolingian Cycle that popularized such medieval French heroes as Charlemagne, Roland (Italianized as Orlando), Renaud, Ganelon, and Angelica.
The twelfth-century chanson de geste, La Chanson de Roland, features the owners of two significant beards: King Charlemagne and the traitorous Count Ganelon. Charlemagne's beard is specifically mentioned twenty-six times in the poem and serves as his most distinguishing characteristic.
Gace Brule, for example, rails against courtly fraudulence, claiming that most love-talkers sing "par esfors et desloiaument" (as an exercise and insincerely), (Goldin 1983, 15.1-2), while Thibaut de Champagne voices aristocratic self-criticism through a shepherdess who calls knights "tricheor" (traitors) and "menteor" (liars), "pis" (worse) than Ganelon (Goldin 1983, 37.17-20; 33-6).
Most studies on molluscan distribution in reef systems have been conducted on true coral reefs (Salvat, 1967, 1972; Taylor, 1968, 1971; Thomassin and Ganelon, 1977; Sheppard, 1984; McClanahan, 1989, 1990; DIaz et al., 1990; Augustin et al., 1999; Wells, 2000; Zuschin et al., 2000, 2001), ecosystems that show deep calcareous formations with an extensive coral cover and diversity.
She starts--unsurprisingly--with the Oxford version, focusing first on the geste [Francor] to which the poet and the characters refer and then on the embedded narratives that stud the text: narratives such as Ganelon's carefully duplicitous account of Roland and the apple or of his own visit to Marsile.