Gargantua and Pantagruel


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Gargantua and Pantagruel

Rabelais’s farcical and obscene 16th-century novel. [Fr. Lit.: Magill I, 298]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the prologue to Don Quixote, questions figure prominently as they do in Gargantua and Pantagruel, foreshadowing the ironic function that they assume in the book.
In the ethical content magnified by artistic-linguistic novelty Joyce also resembled in part Rabelais, as the overwhelming point of view of both Gargantua and Pantagruel and Ulysses hardly surpasses masculine / male imagery.
Rabelais' "Gargantua and Pantagruel" recounts the story of a giant named Gargantua and his son Pantagruel.
Gargantua and Pantagruel, so far in the past, as comets come, can arrive like a new age to surprise our eyes.
Gargantua and Pantagruel Collective title of five comic novels by Rabelais, Francois, published between 1532 and 1564.
Rebalais writes first books of Gargantua and Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel is a vast mock-heroic panorama about an amiable dynasty of giants who are prodigious eaters and drinkers, gay and earthy, Discursive and monumental, the work demonstrates the theme that the real purpose of life is to expand the soul by exploring the sources of varied experience.
Rabelais's tales of Gargantua and Pantagruel contain a surprisingly large number of references to farces, and many episodes within the Chroniques are structured with a farce-like framework.
The "Contexts" section also has an additional twenty pages of new material from The Travels of Martinus Scriblerus, from Dampier's A New Voyage Round the Worm and Rabelais's Gargantua and Pantagruel, from Samuel Sturmy's The Mariner's Magazine and Robert Hooke's "An Account of a Dog dissected."
Gargantua and Pantagruel, Rabelais, translation by Sir Thomas Urquhart and Peter Antony Motteux, Book III, prologue (54 words)
(32.) lnterestingly, Rabelais's Gargantua and Pantagruel also tells of sounds which are frozen and then melted.
In literature giants appear in many folktales, including "Jack and the Beanstalk" and the legend of Paul Bunyan, as well as in such classic satires as Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels and Francois Rabelais's Gargantua and Pantagruel.