Garigliano

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Garigliano

(gärēlyä`nō), lower part of the Liri River, S central Italy, below its junction with the Rapido, or Gari, River (hence Gari-Liriano) near Cassino. It separates Latium from Campania and empties into the Tyrrhenian Sea. A strategic battleground since antiquity, it was the scene (1503) of Gonzalo Fernández de Córdoba's victory over Louis XII of France in the Italian Wars. In World War II heavy fighting occurred (Nov., 1943–May, 1944) near the Garigliano during the Allied drive on Rome, which included the battle for Cassino.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Groundwater flow is directed toward the sea and the Garigliano River [33].
By March 17, 1944, we had advanced to the Garigliano River, which we nicknamed the "Gargling Anna." Our first duty was to maintain a Bailey pontoon bridge [a prefabricated bridge that could be assembled in different forms] that was under frequent German artillery fire.
He won another victory at the Garigliano River in December despite the heroics of the famous Chevalier Bayard, acme of chivalry and on January 1st, 1504, forced the surrender of the last French stronghold, at Gaeta on the Mediterranean coast.
Principal battles: the Garigliano River (central Italy) (1503); Agnadello (near Lodi) (1509); Marignano (Melegnano) (1515).
Born in 1452, the son of Antonio Colonna, Prince of Salerno, and grandnewphew of Pope Martin V; fought with Neapolitan forces against Venice and Pope Sixtus IV during the War of Ferrara (1482-1484); supported Pope Innocent VIII and the Neapolitan barons when they rebelled against Ferdinand I of Naples (1485-1486); assisted Charles VIII of France in his conquest and occupation of Naples (February-May 1495); then joined with Ferdinand II of Naples in driving the French out of Naples (late 1495); served with Gonsalvo de Cordoba's Spanish army in victories over the French at Cerignola (April 28, 1503) and the Garigliano River (December 28); fought for the Spanish against the Venetians at La Motta (October 7, 1513); captured by a French cavalry raid at Villefranche (in Savoy) (summer?
An Italian nobleman from the far northwest of the country; he served the French monarchs Charles VIII and Louis XII; succeeded Gonzago, Marquis of Mantua, as commander of the French army in southern Italy, when Gonzago fell ill and left for home; lulled by a three-month stalemate along the Garigliano River with the Spanish army of Gonzalo de Cordoba, Saluzzo grew careless, and Gonzalo's surprise attack in the midst of very bad weather caught him by surprise (December 29, 1503); routed, he drew some of his army into the small nearby fortress of Gaeta, but was soon compelled to surrender (January 1, 1504); retired to Genoa, where he was stricken with the malaria which had killed many of his men; died there (February?