Garnier, Jean Louis Charles


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Garnier, Jean Louis Charles

(zhäN lwē shärl gärnyā`), 1825–98, French architect, studied at the École des Beaux-Arts and won the Grand Prix de Rome (1848). He was awarded the commission for the Opéra in Paris (1861–75), which is his principal work. It provided an impressive focus for the new boulevards of G. E. Haussmann's city planning. It is an ornate interpretation of Renaissance architecture, especially noted for the grand staircase. Garnier also built the casino at Monte Carlo.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Garnier, Jean Louis Charles

 

Born Nov. 6, 1825, in Paris; died there Aug. 3, 1898. French architect.

Garnier studied at the School of Fine Arts in Paris (1842-48). His main work is the Opéra in Paris (1861-67, finishing touches in 1875). A grandiose structure (with its ground plan of 11,000 sq m), its composition is eclectic, with excessively ornate architectural forms and with a pompous decoration of the interior that made an impression on the taste of the nouveau riche bourgeoisie. It inspired many imitations in a number of European capitals. Other works by Garnier include the Monte Carlo theater (1878-79) and Casino (1861-1910), built in the same pompous eclectic style.

REFERENCE

Pascal, J. L. Ch. Garnier, l’architecte de l’Opéra de Paris. Paris, 1899.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.