Fort Garry

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Fort Garry,

two trading posts of the Hudson's Bay Company, built on the present-day site of Winnipeg, Man., Canada, at the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine rivers. The first, Upper Fort Garry, was built in 1822 on the site of Fort Gibralter, a post of the North West Company from 1809 to 1816. It was named for Nicholas Garry, the deputy governor of the Hudson's Bay Company. Damaged by flood, it was replaced by Lower Fort Garry (1831–33) farther down on the Red River. Upper Fort Garry was rebuilt in 1835 and became the center of the Red River fur trade. Fort Garry National Historic Park contains a restoration of Lower Fort Garry.

Garry, Fort:

see Fort GarryFort Garry,
two trading posts of the Hudson's Bay Company, built on the present-day site of Winnipeg, Man., Canada, at the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine rivers. The first, Upper Fort Garry, was built in 1822 on the site of Fort Gibralter, a post of the North West Company
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, Canada.
References in periodicals archive ?
They include letters from Fort Garry, Fort Ellice and Touchwood Hills in the 1860s; Fort Pitt and Carlton House in the early 1870s; Lac La Biche, 1874-81; Lesser Slave Lake, 1881-85; Fort Vermilion, 1886-89; and Fort St.
There are places where evidence is indisputable, such as Prince of Wales Fort, Lower Fort Garry, Fort Union, and Fort Vancouver to name just a few.
Fur trade sites such as Lower Fort Garry, Fort Langley, Fort Edmonton and Fort William attract several hundred thousand visitors every year--cumulatively far more people than will ever read scholarly or even popular histories of the fur trade or sit through a university seminar on Western Canadian history.
It includes major interpretive sites such as Old Fort William, Lower Fort Garry, Fort Edmonton and Fort Langley, smaller (at least in terms of staffing, budget and visitors) sites such as Rocky Mountain House, York Factory, Prince of Wales' Fort, Fort St.
At Coyne and Howay's suggestion, many sites connected with the fur trade were commemorated in the 1920s and early 1930s, including Fort Rouge, Fort Garry, Fort La Reine, Wawanesa and Prince of Wales' Fort in Manitoba; Fort Livingstone and Cumberland House in Saskatchewan; Fort Edmonton, Jasper House, David Thompson, Henry House, Rocky Mountain House, and Methye Portage in Alberta; and Fort Langley, Simon Fraser and Alexander Mackenzie in British Columbia.