Gas-Press Welding

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gas-Press Welding

 

a welding process in which the metal is heated with gas flames and the hot parts are then upset (pressed together). The heating is done with multiple-flame welding torches consisting of a large number (up to 100 or more) of small flames uniformly distributed over the heated surface which, after a minute or two, becomes partially molten. Next the parts are pressed together and united. Usually acetylene-oxygen flames are employed for heating, and a hydraulic clamping mechanism, which firmly holds the parts to be joined, upsets them. Gas-press welding is used to produce, for instance, butt joints in pipes as well as railway rails. Resistance electric-arc welding is often used in its place.

K. K. KHRENOV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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