Gashouse Gang


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Gashouse Gang

boisterous Cardinals ballclub of the 1930s. [Am. Sports: Shankle, 167]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Louis Cardinals, in their Gashouse Gang days of the early 1930s, had two--Frankie Frisch and Ripper Collins--and it was the Cardinals' radio broadcasts that made their way into the Mantle home in northeastern Oklahoma.
(3.) John Heidenry, The Gashouse Gang (New York: Public Affairs, 2007), 30.
There is a good narrative of the well-known 1934 World Series against the Gashouse Gang. Skipper also tells the stories of the two lesser-known Series that Gehringer played in, Detroit's 1935 victory over the Cubs and their 1940 loss to Cincinnati.
Notes: A 1953 inductee into baseball's Hall of Fame, Dean was part of the 1934 "Gashouse Gang," with brother Paul "Daffy" Dean, as the St.
Fans still leave baseballs by the tomb of the Gashouse Gang great.
It was the year that sportswriter Frank Grimm of the old New York Sun nicknamed them the Gashouse Gang.
But the system that would forge the 1930s Gashouse Gang dynasty became a standard--even necessary--element of the game and, according to Lowenfish's brilliant analysis, actually helped the minor leagues.
Lawrence Gevry, retired police officer and a longtime photographer, was in a nostalgic mood on a recent afternoon, claiming Webster "gashouse gang" status.
Playing with its famous Gashouse Gang for four seasons, Durocher hit his career-best batting average as a regular, .286 in 1936.
They also tangle with their rivals, the Gashouse Gang, and catch tire thieves and gas bootleggers.
They're like a bunch of mavericks, like the Gashouse Gang of the old Cardinals.
and found ourselves touched by an Angel--a gashouse gang of them.