Gasoline and Oil Resistance

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gasoline and Oil Resistance

 

the ability of polymeric materials to resist the action of liquid fuels and oils. On contact with the hydrocarbons contained in the fuel or oil, the majority of polymers swell, as a result of which their strength is reduced and their relative elongation and flexibility are altered. The change of mass, volume, or any of the strength indexes of the material during its exposure to a given medium for a specific length of time can serve as the criterion of gasoline and oil resistance.

Gasoline and oil resistance depends on the chemical constitution of the polymer, its structure, the degree of curing (vulcanization), and the composition of the material of which the polymer is part, as well as on the thickness and porosity of the item. Polyamides, polyvinyl alcohol, polyethers, butadiene-nitrile rubbers, and fluorine-containing rubbers have high gasoline and oil resistance. In view of the fact that polymeric materials are often utilized in contact with hydrocarbons and oils, their resistance to the action of these reagents is of great practical value.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.