Gassendi


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Gassendi

(ga-sen -dee) See table at craters.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Pierre Gassendi, too, was an admirer of Lucretius, as well as an acquaintance of Hobbes, and Locke and Jefferson were enthusiasts for his writing.
Descartes' response to Gassendi (and presumably what would have been his response to Hume) is that our idea of imperfection depends upon our idea of perfection (rather than the converse, which Gassendi asserted).
Scholars of philosophy consider ideas in Lennon's 1993 The Battle of the Gods and the Giants: The Legacies of Descartes and Gassendi, 1655-1715, which explored debates over a new metaphysics to support the new mechanical view of nature.
Father Pierre Gassendi (1592-1655), philosopher, mathematician, and astronomer, produced a Christianized atomism that allowed for the spirit of God, and the human rational soul.
Giordano Bruno, Galileo, Pierre Gassendi, Thomas Hobbes, and Rene Descartes were all key contributors.
Shakespeare is given short shrift (Mercutio's "atomi," Romeo and Juliet I.iv.58), Spenser and Donne none at all, though their Lucretianism is beyond doubt (Greenlaw 1920; Hirsch 1991; Passannante 2008); Montaigne is given pride of place; then a quick sprint through Pierre Gassendi, who reconciled atomism with Christianity in the 1640s, Lucy Hutchinson, Isaac Newton and Erasmus Darwin leads us to Thomas Jefferson's 1820 confession that "I am an Epicurean" (263).
Though Stenger paints an overall negative picture of Christianity he does praise one theist and scientist, Pierre Gassendi, who lived in the latter part of the seventeenth century.