gastrolith

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gastrolith

[′ga·strə‚lith]
(vertebrate zoology)
A pebble swallowed by certain animals and retained in the gizzard or stomach, where it serves to grind food.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some dinosaurs also possessed gastroliths, perhaps for a similar reason.
During ecdysis, the gastroliths collapse into the stomach, where they are digested.
However, more recent studies suggest that ACC is the major form in most temporary calcium carbonate deposits, such as the gastroliths (Addadi et al.
I argued that it had strong relevance to geology and paleontology because we can use those gastroliths as clues about diet and migratory patterns.
For example, the body mass of crocodiles and alligators that is rock gastroliths is 0.
New analyses of the gastroliths in ostriches are casting doubt on that theory.
In some crayfish, gastroliths are reported to be composed of calcium carbonate in an extremely poorly crystalline state, as they do not diffract X-rays or electrons (10).
Those clues include gastroliths, or stomach stones, that would have ground ingested vegetation to a pulp.
Gastroliths are similar to modern birds' gizzard stones, which help grind vegetation and hard-shelled invertebrates into a more easily digested pulp.
Gillette, Utah's state paleontologist, identifies the rocks as gastroliths -- so called "stomach stones" that certain animals hold within their digestive tract to grind food.