gastrolith

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gastrolith

[′ga·strə‚lith]
(vertebrate zoology)
A pebble swallowed by certain animals and retained in the gizzard or stomach, where it serves to grind food.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some dinosaurs also possessed gastroliths, perhaps for a similar reason.
The calcium ions are taken up from the hemolymph to form the gastroliths. During ecdysis, the gastroliths collapse into the stomach, where they are digested.
n A sauropod's stomach could hold up to half a tonne and had large stones inside it - gastroliths - to help grind down and digest the food.
One specimen (GCSU 4462) contained two crayfish gastroliths and a few isolated legs in its gut.
This student told me, "This doesn't really have anything to do with geology, but it sure is neat!" I argued that it had strong relevance to geology and paleontology because we can use those gastroliths as clues about diet and migratory patterns.
For example, the body mass of crocodiles and alligators that is rock gastroliths is 0.5-1.0%.
The rest is transported out of the apical membrane to form gastroliths. This explains the greater content of calcium in R cells during premolt compared to intermolt.
New analyses of the gastroliths in ostriches are casting doubt on that theory.
In some crayfish, gastroliths are reported to be composed of calcium carbonate in an extremely poorly crystalline state, as they do not diffract X-rays or electrons (10).
Those clues include gastroliths, or stomach stones, that would have ground ingested vegetation to a pulp.
The gastroliths, or stomach stones, that have been found in some ornithomimids provide another clue that the creatures didn't consume large animals, says Makovicky.