propagation delay

(redirected from Gate delay)

propagation delay

[‚präp·ə′gā·shən di‚lā]
(electronics)
The time required for a signal to pass through a given complete operating circuit; it is generally of the order of nanoseconds, and is of extreme importance in computer circuits.

propagation delay

The time it takes to transmit a signal from one place to another. Propagation delay is dependent solely on distance and two thirds the speed of light. Signals going through a wire or fiber generally travel at two thirds the speed of light. Contrast with nodal processing delay.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 1 shows ring oscillator gate delay versus [V.
Then the logic gate delay and the leakage power of the device exhibits an exponential dependence on the supply voltages and threshold voltages in the sub threshold region.
Among specific topics are a new algorithm for post-silicon clock measurement and tuning, a schematic-based extraction methodology for dislocation defects in analog/mixed-signal devices, modeling gate delay faults by means of transition delay faults, and predicting pixel defect rates based on image sensor parameters.
The typical gate delay used for recording the calibration curve was chosen from the experimental condition that gave the best signal-to-noise and signal-to-background ratio.
This process delivers a 100 Ps gate delay for a 2 input NAND gate with a fan out of two.
2], whose gate delay (or switching speed) is improved by S, and whose amount of energy used each time a gate switches on or off is reduced by [S.
Metal delay becomes an important part of a gate delay for a few millimeter or longer interconnection lines.
The propagation delay or gate delay is the length of time which starts when the input to a logic gate becomes stable and valid to change, to the time that the output of that logic gate is stable and valid to change.
This approach requires creating a separate scan shift path and adding a gate delay to control the Q output in the design's functional path.
Subnanosecond gate delay times were soon achieved, but with a power consumption per logic gate of a few tens of milliwatts.
Standard cell libraries containing more than 1000 cells feature 11ps gate delay and a library density of more than 400,000 gates per mm2.