Gaugamela


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Gaugamela

 

a hill (modern name, Tell Gōmel) and settlement (near modern Gōmel-sū) in Mesopotamia, northwest of the city of Arbela. On Oct. 1, 331 B.C., a decisive battle took place near Gaugamela between Alexander of Macedonia (40,000 infantry, 7,000 cavalry) and the Persian king Darius III Codomannus (60,000-80,000 infantry, up to 15,000 cavalry, 200 war chariots, and 15 battle elephants). Smashing the Persians’ covering force on the Euphrates River, Alexander moved toward Gaugamela, where the Persian army had taken position. The Persians attacked both flanks of the Macedonians and broke through their left flank to the camp, where the Macedonian infantry stopped them. Alexander struck a decisive blow to the left wing of the Persian army with the right flank of his army, consisting mainly of crack cavalry. He smashed the Persian left wing and broke through to the rear of the attacking Persian right wing. The Persian troops fled, and the Macedonian cavalry pursued them for 50 km.

References in periodicals archive ?
His article "Dodging Gaugamela: Three Ways in Which We Invite Catastrophe--and How to Stop Doing So" is an exciting travel through time and history, allowing readers to learn many lessons along the way.
Summary: Amid a lot of controversy about the Battle of Gaugamela's location, it has been recently discovered that the battle took place in a location near Bardarash District in Duhok Province.
Nas fontes mais antigas, os udis sao designados como um dos protagonistas tendo participado da batalha de Alexandre Magno contra os persas das tropas do satrapa dos medos em Gaugamela (331 a.C).
331BC: Alexander the Great's Macedonians won a decisive victory over the Persians led by Darius III at the battle of Gaugamela, leading to the downfall of the Persian Empire: Darius was murdered by one of his own aristocrats after the defeat.
France in 1940 comes to mind, or Alexander's victory over the Persians at Gaugamela, or the triumph of Wellington and Blucher at Waterloo.
Researching the post-Assyrian history of Nineveh, she realized that Alexander the Great had actually camped near the city in 331BC - just before he defeated the Persians at the famous battle of Gaugamela. It's known that Alexander's army actually camped by the side of one of the great aqueducts that carried water to what Dr.
the GreatAAEs triumph over Persian king Darius III at the Battle of Gaugamela, which ultimately led to the demise of the Achaemenid Empire.
In 331 B.C, Alexander defeated Darius at the battle of Gaugamela. The following year, he seized the Persian capital, Persepolis.
From the time of his initial defeat of Darius at Issus, through his campaign into Egypt, and his final defeat of Darius at Gaugamela (also known as the Battle of Arbela) Alexander displayed an acute awareness of the logistical requirements of his army.