gauge

(redirected from gauger)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

gauge

, gage
1. a standard measurement, dimension, capacity, or quantity
2. any of various instruments for measuring a quantity
3. any of various devices used to check for conformity with a standard measurement
4. the thickness of sheet metal or the diameter of wire
5. the distance between the rails of a railway track: in Britain 4 ft. 8½ in. (1.435 m)
6. the distance between two wheels on the same axle of a vehicle, truck, etc.
7. Nautical the position of a vessel in relation to the wind and another vessel. One vessel may be windward (weather gauge) or leeward (lee gauge) of the other
8. a measure of the fineness of woven or knitted fabric, usually expressed as the number of needles used per inch
9. the width of motion-picture film or magnetic tape
10. (of a pressure measurement) measured on a pressure gauge that registers zero at atmospheric pressure; above or below atmospheric pressure

Gauge

To shape a brick by rubbing or molding it into a particular size.

Gauge

 

a scaleless measuring device designed for checking the dimensions, shape, and relative positions of the parts of articles. The checking consists in a comparison of the dimensions of a product with a measuring gauge in terms of the fit or degree of contact of their surfaces. This comparison makes possible classification of products as acceptable (if the dimensions lie within tolerance limits), defective (with repair possible), or irreparable.

The most widely used limit (go-no go) gauges are go gauges, which are made according to the minimum limiting size of an opening or the maximum size of a shaft and fit into acceptable products, and no-go gauges, which are made for the maximum size of an opening or the minimum size of a shaft and will not fit into acceptable products. Gauges are also classified according to purposes: working gauges, used for testing products at the manufacturing plant; acceptance gauges, used by the consumer for rechecking products; and reference gauges, which are used for testing or regulation of working and acceptance gauges. The advantages of gauges are simplicity of design and the possibility of integrated checking of products of complex shape; disadvantages include low versatility and the inability to determine actual size deviations. The use of these gauges in machine building is decreasing because of the introduction of universal measuring methods and mechanized and automatic devices.

M. A. PALEI

gauge

[gāj]
(electromagnetism)
One of the family of possible choices for the electric scalar potential and magnetic vector potential, given the electric and magnetic fields.

gauge, gage

1. The thickness of sheet metal or metal tubing, usually designated by a number.
2. The diameter of wire or a screw, usually designated by a number.
3. The distance between two points, such as parallel lines of connectors.
4. A strip of metal or wood used as a guide to control the thickness of a bituminous or concrete paving; called a screed when used in plastering.
5. A measuring instrument, esp. one for measuring liquid level, dimensions, or pressure.
7. In roofing, the length of a shingle, slate, or tile that is exposed when laid.
8. The quantity of gauging plaster used with common plaster (lime putty) to hasten its setting, etc.
9. To mix gauging plaster with lime putty, to effect better control of the set, to prevent shrinkage of the lime putty, and to increase its strength.
10. To cut, chip, or rub stone or brick to a uniform size or shape.

gauge

gauge
i. Any pressure, temperature, or flow-measuring instrument.
ii. A standard measure of sheet and wire thickness. The higher the number, the lesser the thickness.
iii. A hand comparator for a GO/NO GO check on an exact dimension or a screw thread.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lightbody, Every Man his own Gauger, London: G.C...., 1695.
(30.) Hirschl RB, Pranikoff T, Gauger P, Schreiner RJ, Dechert R, Bartlett RH.
Annie Gauger, in the acknowledgments to the Norton annotated edition, reports that an advisor once told her that "doing an annotated 'Willows' is roughly the literary equivalent of building the space shuttle single-handed" (371), and indeed it must have been a daunting task, considering that the two annotated editions between them still leave work to be done, allusions to be ferreted out, and mysteries to be explained.
Terry Gauger has marketed a super tool, the unHOOKum (www.unhookum.com) that does a great job.
(4.) Vincent AL, Swenson SL, Lager KM, Gauger PC, Loiacono C, Zhang Y.
Gary Gauger spent three years on death row having been bullied into believing he might have murdered his parents in an alcoholic blackout, despite there being no physical evidence to connect him to their deaths.
The pellets rotated at 800-950 rpm with a torque of 5 Nm (Gauger, 1998) against the cast iron disc from 2-8 h (see Tab.
"There has been no talk of dropping it," said Jeff Gauger, editor of the The Repository in Canton, Ohio.
Pseudomonas atlantica (ATCC 19,262), Photobacterium damselae damselae (Genbank DQ005203), Vibrio harveyi DN01 (Gauger et al.
Andreas Gauger, chief executive of 1&1, said: "Consumers now place a high value on the ability to talk to businesses in real-time online."
the view of the trial court, the fact that part of the gauger's
For example, if the user is a data collector, pumper, logger or gauger, mechanic or inspector, they just log into the device and scan the RFID tag which electronically recognizes their craft and shows only screens involving data collection.