Golan

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Golan

(gō`lən), in the Bible, refuge city, located in the tribal territory of Manasseh E of the Jordan; it was also a levitical city. Golan gives its name to the rocky plateau known as the Golan HeightsGolan Heights,
strategic upland region (2003 est. pop. 10,500), c.500 sq mi (1,250 sq km), SW Syria. It borders S Lebanon, NE Israel, and NW Jordan. It takes its name from the ancient city of Golan and was known as Gaulanitis in New Testament times.
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Golan

appointed city of sanctuary for unintentional murderers. [O.T.: Joshua 20:8]
See: Refuge
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the basis of her survey of twenty sites, she contended that Byzantine Gaulanitis was a place of "Jewish-Christian cohabitation" capable of being seen as a "melting pot of religions and societies."(21) Important to her case was (1) evidence of both Jews and Christians in Na'ran (a community squarely in the cluster of towns and villages in the area Ma'oz had marked off as occupied by Jews only) and (2) the clear indication of a sizable Jewish community in Farj--a village "far outside the area believed [by Ma'oz] to have been occupied by Jews."(22)
In Butmiyye, in eastern central Gaulanitis, another lintel (photograph 26) (with an incomplete and indecipherable inscription of only four letters) was found.(50) At its center is incised the top half of a menorah (not a "tree of life," with which it might have been confused, since the base or three-footed stand of the candlestick is not pictured).
(16.) Claudine Dauphin, "Jewish and Christian Communities in the Roman and Byzantine Gaulanitis: A Study of the Evidence from Archaeological Surveys," Palestine Exploration Quarterly 114 (1982): 129-42.