Gauss' theorem

Gauss' theorem

[′gau̇s ‚thir·əm]
(mathematics)
The assertion, under certain light restrictions, that the volume integral through a volume V of the divergence of a vector function is equal to the surface integral of the exterior normal component of the vector function over the boundary surface of V. Also known as divergence theorem; Green's theorem in space; Ostrogradski's theorem.
At a point on a surface the product of the principal curvatures is an invariant of the surface, called the Gaussian curvature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using Gauss' theorem, we can rewrite this as a surface integral:
Again, we employ Gauss' theorem to express the total energy as a surface integral:
One more time, we employ Gauss' theorem to express the total energy as a surface integral:
Like our above illustration of the Poisson equation, a misunderstanding of Gauss' Theorem,
2]u, we cannot determine the nature of the scalar field u simply from the Poisson equation or Gauss' Theorem.
So one can consider the hypothesis of continuity as a first approximation, and one can re-examine the Gauss' theorem