References in periodicals archive ?
Like James von Geldern, Malysheva sees the November 1920 re-enactment in Petrograd of the storming of the Winter Palace as a crucial moment: thus was the myth of October cleared of anything extraneous.
(10) James yon Geldern, Bolshevik Festivals, 1917-1920 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993); Karen Petrone, Life Has Become More Joyous, Comrades: Celebrations in the Time of Stalin (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2000); Malte Roll, Das sowjetische Massenfest (Hamburg: Hamburger Edition, 2006)--the last reviewed in Kritika 9, 2 (2008): 472-80.
There is also a substantial literature on state festivals: see, e.g., James von Geldern, Bolshevik Festivals, 1917-1921 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993); Malte Rolf, Sovetskii massovyiprazdnik v Voronezhe i Tsentral'no-Chernozemnoi oblasti (1927-1932) (Voronezh: Izdatel'stvo Voronezhskogo gosudarstvennogo universiteta, 2000); Karen Petrone, Life Has Become More Joyous, Comrades: Celebrations in the Time of Stalin (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2000); and Svetlana Malysheva, Sovetskaia prazdnichnaia kul'tura v provintsii: Prostranstvo, simvoly, istoricheskie mify (1917-1927) (Kazan: Ruten, 2005).
(6) James von Geldern, Bolshevik Festivals, 1917-1920 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993); Christel Lane, The Rites of Rulers: Ritual in Industrial Society.
According to James von Geldern, tsarist celebrations were traditionally composed of two elements, a dynastic observance and popular entertainment: "solemnity and merriment stood side by side." Bolshevik festivals evolved into a similar pattern by late 1918.