Aulus Gellius

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Gellius, Aulus

(jĕl`yəs), fl. 2d cent., Roman writer. He was a lawyer who spent at least a year in Athens and wrote Noctes Atticae [Attic nights], a collection of discussions of law, antiquities, and sundry other subjects in 20 books (of which 19 and a fraction survive). The work is chiefly valuable as a storehouse of quotations from lost works.

Aulus Gellius:

see Gellius, AulusGellius, Aulus
, fl. 2d cent., Roman writer. He was a lawyer who spent at least a year in Athens and wrote Noctes Atticae [Attic nights], a collection of discussions of law, antiquities, and sundry other subjects in 20 books (of which 19 and a fraction survive).
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References in classic literature ?
Gellius saith, Hominem delirum, qui verborum minutiis rerum frangit pondera.
15.2-3 on Phocion/Electra; Aulus Gellius, NA 6.4 on Polus/Electra; Plutarch, Pelop.
In the present paper,(3) I will re-examine a valuable but under-appreciated witness: Aulus Gellius, author of the Attic Nights.(4) Some of Gellius' brief essays contain translations from Greek, and a few of them were prepared specifically as exercises in the ars interpretandi.
(85) Bonner 1949, 2; Gellius 10,15 speaks of the priests of Jupiter shedding any form of knot or tie that might inhibit their sacred power from flowing freely.
Those entrepreneurs of the word who guided Vergil's text into print were like prospectors panning for textual gold in the riverbed of Servius, Tiberius Donatus, Aulus Gellius, and others whose Vergilian discourse gave the glitter of authenticity to readings which were in most cases better left sunk in the sediment where they were found.
(9) As for this particular lex Antia, Gellius (2.24.13) informs us that, apart from curtailing expenditures, it also stipulated that magistrates in office and those about to enter office could dine only with certain individuals, and Macrobius (Sat.
(61) That they were open to the public is stated by Gellius N.
As related by the chief classical source, Aulus Gellius, the tale goes as follows.
Like the treatises of contemporary philosophers, surviving sophistic texts and the biographical accounts of Philostratus and Aulus Gellius describe a quest for ethical "technologies" by which the sophist may regulate bodily and mental activity in accordance with certain ideals, varying according to the philosophical beliefs and the commitment of the individual practitioner.
The reason is that Furius Antias is called vetus poeta by Gellius (18.11.2), a term which should make him a contemporary of Catulus (b.
'Classic', in the dual meaning proposed by Aulus Gellius:
In the story by Gellius, which escaped slave removed a thorn from a lion's paw?