Gelon


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Gelon

(jē`lŏn), d. 478 B.C., Greek Sicilian ruler. As tyrant of Gela, his native city, he interfered in the struggle for power in Syracuse (485 B.C.) and made himself the leader of the popular party there. From that time he ruled Syracuse and dominated Greek Sicily. In 480 B.C., Hamilcar and his Carthaginians attacked Sicily in great force, landing at Panormus and advancing to besiege Gelon's father-in-law, Theron of Acragas, in Himera. Gelon came to his aid and crushed the Carthaginian army, which was the first great blow to Punic prestige. It is celebrated by Pindar in his great First Pythian. Gelon was succeeded by his brother Hiero IHiero I
, 5th cent. B.C., Greek Sicilian ruler, tyrant of Syracuse (478–467 B.C.). He succeeded his brother Gelon. A noted patron of literature, Hiero had Simonides, Pindar, and Aeschylus at his court.
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References in classic literature ?
The rich also even in democracies, despising the disorder and anarchy which will arise, hope to better themselves by the same means which happened at Thebes after the battle of Oenophyta, where, in consequence of bad administration, the democracy was destroyed; as it was at Megara, where the power of the people was lost through anarchy and disorder; the same thing happened at Syracuse before the tyranny of Gelon; and at Rhodes there was the same sedition before the popular government was overthrown.
Remijsen (2009:247) notes that the ruler of Syracuse, Gelon, had 'paid the best sprinter of the moment to compete for Syracuse instead of his home town'.
A retorica surge pelas necessidades da pratica forense, como uma consequencia indireta da tirania de Gelon e seu sucessor Hieron I, os quais expropriaram terras de diversos cidadaos para concede-las a membros de sua guarda pessoal.
By "following the money" (ix), in chapters five and six Gerhard expands our knowledge of Diane Gelon's central role in orchestrating fundraising for both the completion and tour of The Dinner Party.
Diane Gelon, one of Chicago's first volunteers, explained that the open studio "did not start as a feminist group.
AROUND 216 BC, shortly before his death, the septuagenarian Archimedes presented an astronomical treatise to Gelon II, king of his native Syracuse on the island of Sicily.