Gemini telescopes

Gemini telescopes

Two 8.1-meter groundbased telescopes with identical capabilities for use in the infrared, visible, and near ultraviolet. One (completed in 1998) is sited in the northern hemisphere on Mauna Kea in Hawaii and is known as the Gillett Telescope or Gemini North; the other (which saw first light in 2001) is in the southern hemisphere at Cerro Pachón in Chile and is known as Gemini South. The two telescopes together provide full sky coverage as well as similar performance in programs spanning both hemispheres. The telescopes are a joint venture between the USA, UK, Canada, Argentina, Chile, and Brazil. The US National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) administers the work of the telescopes through the NOAO Gemini Science Center (NGSC), headquartered in Tucson, Arizona. Image quality at near-infrared wavelengths is better than 0.1 arcsecond over a 1-arcminute field of view. The use of adaptive optics extends this near-diffraction-limited angular resolution to shorter wavelengths. A wide-field capability of 45′, for optical wavelengths, allows simultaneous spectroscopic sampling of multiple objects.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keck Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, the Gemini telescopes on Mauna Kea and in Chile, the Automated Planet Finder of the University of California Observatories and the Large Binocular Telescope operated by the University of Arizona.
He enjoys experimenting with new ways to capture the spectacular skies over the twin Gemini telescopes on Mauna Kea and Cerro Pachon.
The British team has been awarded time on the twin eight-metre Gemini telescopes in Hawaii and Chile, New Scientist magazine reported yesterday.
2- meter Subaru telescope on Mauna Kea, and a similar pair of telescopes for the International Gemini Telescopes Project on Mauna Kea and Chile's Cerro Pachon.
Part of this drop, an agency official explained, traces to the completion of NSF's financing of the twin GEMINI telescopes.
The Gemini Observatory program includes two Gemini telescopes that are located on both sides of the equator -- in Hawaii and in Chile -- to provide complete sky coverage for astronomers within the seven-country Gemini partnership.
The Gemini telescopes have been engineered with modern networking technologies in mind and have been fully integrated into the Internet network.
Thus it's not surprising that Mirror Laboratory director Angel argues that the Gemini telescopes should be faster than f/1.
The Gemini telescopes incorporate new technologies that allow large, relatively thin mirrors to collect and focus starlight with extraordinary precision.
Additionally, the GSC-II is to be used to support target acquisition and pointing at many of the new ground-based telescopes currently under construction, including the 8-meter Gemini telescopes in Chile and Hawaii.