Gene Amdahl


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Amdahl, Gene

(1922–  ) computer engineer; born in Flandreau, S.D. Working for International Business Machines (IBM) at Poughkeepsie, N.Y., he helped design the IBM 704 in the 1950s and the S/360 series of computers in the early 1960s. In the 1970s, he ran Amdahl Corporation, then the largest manufacturer of IBM-compatible computers. In 1980, he formed Trilogy to build large computers.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.

Gene Amdahl

(person)
A former IBM engineer who founded Amdahl Corporation.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
Gene Amdahl [5] defined his law for the special case of using n processors (cores) in parallel when he argued for the single-processor approach's validity for achieving large-scale computing capabilities.
In 1967, Gene Amdahl proposed an often overlooked law of scaling: A program's sequential computation largely limits the maximum achievable speedup [5].
Fear, uncertainty and doubt, known as the FUD concept, was coined in the 1970s by computer architect Gene Amdahl when he left IBM to start his own company.
Sometimes called Amdahl's Curse, and named for computer pioneer Gene Amdahl, it lacks the upbeat outlook of Moore's Law.