Gene Kelly


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Related to Gene Kelly: Grace Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Fred Astaire
Gene Kelly
Eugene Curran Kelly
Birthday
BirthplacePittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Died
NationalityAmerican
Occupation
Actor, dancer, singer, director, producer, choreographer
EducationPeabody High School

Kelly, Gene,

1912–96, American dancer, choreographer, movie actor, and director, b. Pittsburgh as Eugene Curran Kelly. Kelly started dancing on Broadway in 1938 and first gained fame in the title role of the Broadway musical Pal Joey (1940). He moved to Hollywood in 1941 and soon starred in his first film, For Me and My Gal (1942). His best-known work was in motion pictures, where he excelled in an inventive combination of camera and dance techniques in such films as On the Town (1949), An American in Paris (1951; Academy Award), Singin' in the Rain (1952)—which contains his single most famous performance—and Invitation to the Dance (1956). A skillful, expressive dancer with a joyfully muscular yet lyrical style, he also sang in a thin yet appealing voice. Among Kelly's other film musicals were Anchors Aweigh (1945), Take Me Out to the Ballgame (1949), Brigadoon (1954), and Les Girls (1957). He also played dramatic film roles, as in Inherit the Wind (1960), and directed several movies, including The Happy Road (1950) and Hello Dolly (1969).

Bibliography

See biographies by C. Hirschhorn (1975), A. Yudkoff (1999), and C. and S. Brideson (2017).

Kelly, (Eugene Curran) Gene

(1912–  ) movie actor, dancer, director, choreographer; born in Pittsburgh, Pa. A dance instructor and manual worker with a degree in economics, he became a Broadway chorus boy before he starred in Pal Joey (1939). He made his film debut in For Me and My Gal (1942); as an athletic dancer with a breezy disposition, he went on to star in several comedies and dramas, but made his irrepressible mark in musicals such as Singin' in the Rain (1952). The director of Hello Dolly! (1969), he was given an honorary Oscar (1951).
References in periodicals archive ?
But it has the pas de deux that Leslie Caron and Gene Kelly dance at the end.
While not matching Gene Kelly, which is almost certainly impossible to do on stage, he comes close.
He directed specials for many stars of the early television years including Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor, Jack Benny, George Burns, Lucille Ball and Bob Newhart.
Gene Kelly allayed the fears of concerned parents Ron and Nancy Reagan by reassuring them that "not all ballet dancers are homosexual." JFK concluded a quickie with Marlene Dietrich by asking, "Did you ever make it with my father?" to which Marlene said no, and Jack replied, "Well, that's one place I'm in first." Jackie?
Gene Kelly Actor, singer, dancer and director known for his
Humphrey Bogart, Katharine Hepburn, Gene Kelly, Vincent Price, Danny Kaye, Robert Young, Edward G.
In the latest, Paula Abdul dances a duet with a young Gene Kelly.
By: Osama Fatim CAIRO -- 23 August 2017: When we hear the words 'Singing in the Rain,' the name Gene Kelly jumps to our minds and we wonder where the musical movies have gone now.
Todd Pletcher (pictured) 50 seventime US champion trainer; Sir Edmund Loder Bt 76 ownerbreeder of Marwell & Marling; John Provan 71 owner of Pineau De Re; Eric Sands 61 trainer of Flobayou & Perfect Promise; Gene Kelly 89 rider of Impney & Gay Record; Janos Tandari 70 former champion jockey in Sweden; David Williams 50 clerk of the course at Doncaster 2006-11; Sir Brian Pomeroy 73 chairman of the Gambling Commission 2008-11; Gary Smith 55 SIS chief executive 2012-17; Ken Butler 81 rider of Loppylugs; Chris Dennis 49 jump jockey-turned-inspector of courses; Craig Thake 52 Racing Post head of data (technical and development); Alan Yuill Walker 79 bloodstock journalist Please notify birthday greetings to us at least one week before publication
Q We have a great photo of the actress Debbie Reynolds and actor Gene Kelly from the movie Singing in the Rain.
Yet no such worries are necessary over this stage version of the 1952 Gene Kelly musical because it just makes it all the more authentic.