General


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general

1. Education designating a degree awarded at some universities, studied at a lower academic standard than an honours degree
2. Med relating to or involving the entire body or many of its parts; systemic
3. Logic (of a statement) not specifying an individual subject but quantifying over a domain
4. a title for the head of a religious order, congregation, etc.
5. Med short for general anaesthetic
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

General

 

a military title or rank of the higher command staff of the armed forces. The rank of general was first introduced in France in the 16th century. In the prerevolutionary Russian Army there were the ranks of major general, lieutenant general, general of the infantry, general of the cavalry, general of the artillery, general of the engineers, and field marshal general. The following general ranks were established in the Soviet Army by the May 7, 1940, Decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR: major general, lieutenant general, colonel general, and general of the army (for combined-arms commanders). For all branches and combat arms there exist titles from major general to colonel general with the addition of a corresponding designation (for example, major general of aviation).


General

 

common, universal, principal. The general party line is a guiding line established by higher party authorities (for example, by convocations of the CPSU and plenums of the Central Committee). It determines in concrete terms what the policy of the party will be at a given stage.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Thus delegated on her mission, as it were by Church and State, Mrs General, who had always occupied high ground, felt in a condition to keep it, and began by putting herself up at a very high figure.
"Then it will please me to reply, monsieur, that I do not recognize any one here, that I know no one here but the general, and that it is to him alone I will reply."
He saluted the General respectfully and glanced across the room towards where Thomson was at work.
When in the middle of the room the general was invited to remove his bandage, he did so immediately, and was surprised to see so many well-known faces in a society of whose existence he had till then been ignorant.
'the change of motion is proportional to the impressed force,' or that 'whatever has extension is divisible,' these propositions are to be understood of motion and extension in general; and nevertheless it will not follow that they suggest to my thoughts an idea of motion without a body moved, or any determinate direction and velocity, or that I must conceive an abstract general idea of extension, which is neither line, surface, nor solid, neither great nor small, black, white, nor red, nor of any other determinate colour.
"Please have a look at it"- and Kutuzov with an ironical smile about the corners of his mouth read to the Austrian general the following passage, in German, from the Archduke Ferdinand's letter:
The King looked around for something to throw at General Blug, but as nothing was handy he began to consider that perhaps the man was right and he had been talking foolishly.
As they were surveying the last, the general, after slightly naming a few of the distinguished characters by whom they had at times been honoured, turned with a smiling countenance to Catherine, and ventured to hope that henceforward some of their earliest tenants might be "our friends from Fullerton." She felt the unexpected compliment, and deeply regretted the impossibility of thinking well of a man so kindly disposed towards herself, and so full of civility to all her family.
I knew that "Monsieur le Comte" would take no notice of me when we met at dinner, as also that the General would not dream of introducing us, nor of recommending me to the "Comte." However, the latter had lived awhile in Russia, and knew that the person referred to as an "uchitel" is never looked upon as a bird of fine feather.
"Oh, thank you, thank you, I'm sure," replied the general, considerably taken aback.
"Hurrah!" said those who had listened; but Tip thought most of the Army was too much engaged in chattering to pay attention to the words of the General.
This brave French general ordered his drums to strike up, and immediately marched to encounter Wolfe.