genomic imprinting

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genomic imprinting

[jə¦nō·mik im‚print·iŋ]
(genetics)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Annihilation is a remarkable movie, a skilful and ingenious sophistication of a standard B-thriller template, but it also bears the flawed genetic imprint of the industry that spawned it.
With a genetic imprint of the leader on the party, it is the leader who has to change.
We wanted to test if the conquest of Alexander the Great and other foreign powers has left a genetic imprint on the ancient Egyptian population," co-lead author Verena Schuenemann of the University of Tuebingen said in the Max Planck Institute's (http://www.
That back-to-Africa trek occurred some 3,000 years ago and left a substantial genetic imprint on populations now living in sub-Saharan Africa, say University of Cambridge evolutionary biologist Marcos Gallego Llorente and colleagues.
Rape and pillage were his main weapons of conquest, meaning he and his direct progeny fathered tens - legend says hundreds - of children, ensuring his genetic imprint lives on today.
While Goldstein, professor of molecular genetics at Duke, doesn't make such a strident claim, he does draw on his research to demonstrate that certain contemporary groups of Jews can be linked to certain ancient groups through their genetic imprint.
It's no secret of course that the many conquerors who passed through Cyprus - Franks, Venetians, Arabs and Turks - have left their genetic imprint on the island.
Surprisingly, a few people have suggested that because many of my male forebears were coal-miners who spent many years underground in miserable conditions hewing coal for living, then there may be some genetic imprint left on me which enabled me to manage my underground experience.
Aside from social and ambient induced disciplines or even genetic imprint qualities, it's the rhythm of music that truly reaches the heart and soul.
The research laboratories of the French companies La Lyonnaise des Eaux and BioMerieux have developed a new technique for monitoring water quality, using a DNA chip capable of recognising germs through their genetic imprint.

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