Declaration of the Rights of the Child

(redirected from Geneva Declaration of the Rights of the Child)

Declaration of the Rights of the Child

 

adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on Nov. 20, 1959. The need for the special protection of the rights of the child was first stated in the Geneva Declaration of the Rights of the Child (1924). The declaration adopted by the United Nations proclaims the equal rights of the child in regard to upbringing, education, security, and physical and mental development without distinction or discrimination on account of race, color, sex, language, religion, political or other opinions, national or social origin, property, birth, or other status. The declaration calls upon parents, voluntary organizations, and national governments to recognize the rights of the child and strive for their observance by legislative and other measures. In many states, including all the socialist states, the principles of the Declaration of the Rights of the Child are secured by the constitution and documents of various state and public organizations.

References in periodicals archive ?
THE Geneva Declaration of the Rights of the Child adopted by the League of Nations in 1924 clearly stated, "the child that is hungry must be fed, the child that is sick must be nursed, the child that is backward must be helped, the delinquent child must be reclaimed and the orphan and the waif must be sheltered and succoured'.
"In response to the commitment of the Philippines to various international agreements such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Geneva Declaration of the Rights of the Child and Convention on the Rights of the Child, it is imperative to establish a legal framework that shall protect the young generation of Filipinos," she said.
"In response to the commitment of the Philippines to various international agreements such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Geneva Declaration of the Rights of the Child, and Convention on the Rights of the Child, it is imperative to establish a legal framework that shall protect the young generation of Filipinos," Cerilles said.
In the 1924 Geneva Declaration of the Rights of the Child, the dominant concern was securing the material needs of the child.
World bodies had already stated as much in "the Geneva Declaration of the Rights of the Child of 1924 and in the Declaration of the Rights of the Child adopted by the General Assembly on 20 November 1959" ([paragraph] 9).
She drafted a set of children's rights that was later adopted by the League of Nations as the Geneva Declaration of the Rights of the Child. In 1952, the United Nations adopted and reaffirmed the Declaration of the Rights of the Child and directed its members to follow its principles of protection for all children.

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