Gentile

(redirected from Gentiles)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Gentiles: jews

Gentile

1
Giovanni . 1875--1944, Italian Idealist philosopher and Fascist politician: minister of education (1922--24)

Gentile

2
1. a person who is not a Jew
2. a Christian, as contrasted with a Jew
3. a person who is not a member of one's own church: used esp by Mormons
4. a heathen or pagan
5. of or relating to a race or religion that is not Jewish
6. Christian, as contrasted with Jewish
7. not being a member of one's own church: used esp by Mormons
8. pagan or heathen
References in periodicals archive ?
Continue reading "Daf Yomi: Pagan Gentiles Are Immoral, Weak, Abusive, Untrustworthy, and Murderous" at.
Israel's Chief Sephardic Rabbi Yitzhak Yosef told listeners during his weekly Torah class that according to halakha (Jewish religious law) gentiles are forbidden to live in Israel except under special circumstances.
Attitudes to Gentiles in Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (reprint, 2013)
said that he dreamt of a day "when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will he able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual: 'Free at last
The Jews, who have very low regard for Gentiles, normally call the latter "dogs.
Even when a few non-Jews eventually showed an interest in some aspects of Jesus' message, those first followers presumed Gentiles would first have to convert to Judaism before they could convert to Christianity.
Keeping one foot in the Jewish tradition and one in a burgeoning religious movement proved difficult for Jewish Christians, especially when Gentiles (former pagans) began to convert to Christianity in droves around 40 AD.
T&T Clark International, $70), Michelle Slee examines the problem of the entry of Gentiles into the church of Antioch.
Salkin, Righteous Gentiles in the Hebrew Bible: Ancient Role Models for Sacred Relationships.
Kenny, Similarly, Paul in his Epistles, argues that gentiles become the heirs to Abraham not through circumcision and accepting Jewish Torah, but through belief in Christ.
Donaldson assigns each text to one of four discrete patterns of Jewish universalism: (1) sympathization, texts describing Gentiles engaged in Jewish activity and association; (2) conversion, texts describing Gentiles becoming proselytes; (3) ethical monotheism, texts aligning Greek philosophy and Torah religion as parallel paths to a universal God; and (4) eschatological participation, texts describing Gentiles as beneficiaries in the end-time redemption of Israel (see precis on pp.
Wright that the phrase "all Israel" in l1:26 does not include Gentiles.