geocentric

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geocentric

1. having the earth at its centre
2. measured from or relating to the centre of the earth

geocentric

[¦jē·ō¦sen·trik]
(astronomy)
Relative to the earth as a center; that is measured from the center of the earth.

geocentric

Meaning "earth centered," it refers to orbits around the earth. In ancient times, it meant that the earth was the center of the universe. See geostationary and geosynchronous.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inchofer, although not at all competent in the fields of astronomy and physics, took a strong stand in favor of geocentrism.
But versions of hybrid geocentrism dated back to Martianus Capella in the fifth century A.
Heenan and Perlmutter identified integrative geocentrism as a decision making process whereby MNC managers assess decisions based on their impact on each country.
Geocentrism has been associated with expansion into international markets as well as success in export operations (Dichfl, Koeglmayr, & Mueller, 1990; Kobrin, 1994).
They see this knowledge as a cure for the narrow ethnocentrism and geocentrism so often associated with traditional religion.
In 1550 Melanchton, who defended geocentrism in the name of Aristotle and the Bible, while at the same time appearing tolerant of Copernicus and heliocentrism, said of Christ:
A recent case study found that geocentrism is linked to the ability of born global firms to make their own opportunities in the international marketplace (Cavusgil & Knight, 1997).
157 Anthropocentrism, as a corollary of geocentrism, was a constant feature of human thought during thousands of years, as suggested by the classical armillary spheres.
One may use Chakravarthy and Perlmutter's (1985) framework of ethnocentrism, polycentrism, regiocentrism, and geocentrism to explain managerial mindsets (see Table 1).
Most important, Levania is an inverted image of Earth, but an Earth conceived according to the obsolescent Ptolemaic model of geocentrism.
Ausubel advises, "We must take seriously the Copernican insight about Earth's position in the cosmos and not simply replace geocentrism with anthropocentrism.
Geocentrism implies that (1) local cultures have global implications; (2) truly global theories must be applicable to all cultures; and (3) cross-cultural learning is necessary and feasible.