Custer

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Related to George Armstrong Custer: Sitting Bull, Little Big Horn

Custer

George Armstrong. 1839--76, US cavalry general: Civil War hero, killed fighting the Sioux Indians at Little Bighorn, Montana
References in periodicals archive ?
The path of General Philip Sheridan and his Third Division cavalry commander, George Armstrong Custer, in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley was even less discriminating between combatants and civilians.
The railroad company was anxious to continue the work and to punish the Sioux, so they contracted 1600 troops, headed by Indian fighter George Armstrong Custer, to do the job.
Usually this would not be notable, but this time the parade includes Seventh Cavalry reinactors, along with Edward Garrett, who not only impersonates George Armstrong Custer, but believes he is the reincarnation of the general.
Having consulted every oracle in the lead up to York, I was left with the impression that the chances of any cut in the ground for the Nunthorpe were on a par with General George Armstrong Custer riding out of the Little Bighorn with his flowing golden barnet still intact.
Winchester was making munitions when George Armstrong Custer was still wondering if he should make the Army a career.
General George Armstrong Custer in 1876, prior to his defeat at Little Big Horn.
Garryowen was built on the site of the 1876 battle of Little Bighorn, where General George Armstrong Custer and his 7th Cavalry were massacred whilst trying to attack a huge American Indian camp.
I recently used the bold, young military leader General George Armstrong Custer to make this point--the CEO must get out in front and lead the charge, every single day, to get the business "in control" and set it on a path to double-digit profitability.
At the Battle of the Little Bighorn (LBH), a Civil War legend named George Armstrong Custer met death at the hands of Sitting Bull's warriors.
Within three days euphoria changed to anger as shocking news was telegraphed from the West: on June 25th the nation's foremost Indian fighter, the Civil War hero George Armstrong Custer, with more than 200 of his men, had been slaughtered by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians.
Author Nathaniel Philbrick vividly recalls just when he got hooked on George Armstrong Custer and the Old West.
Despite critics lamenting our current cultural amnesia or, in the more elitist description, historical ignorance, General George Armstrong Custer has continuing cultural resonance as iconic figure, epic failure, and timeless joke.