George Strong Nares

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Nares, George Strong

 

Born Apr. 24, 1831, in Aberdeen; died Jan. 15, 1915, in Surbiton, near London. English navigator, oceanographer, and explorer of the western arctic. Corresponding member of the Royal Society (1875); vice admiral (1892).

Nares took part in H. Kellett’s second arctic expedition in 1852–54. He commanded the corvette Challenger from 1872 to 1874. In 1875 he led an arctic expedition on two ships and entered Lincoln Sea for the first time on one of them, the Alert. Sled teams of the expedition discovered the northern shore of Ellesmere Island, the coastal Challenger Mountains, and the northwestern coast of Greenland, in particular Wulffs Land.

WORKS

Narrative of a Voyage to the Polar Sea During 1875–76, vols. 1–2. London, 1878.
References in periodicals archive ?
As stated in the account by Sir George Nares in Apollonio's book (p.
Packed multitudes occupied each pier and jetty on both sides of the harbour,' wrote the expedition's captain, George Nares, describing how 'the air rang with the shouts of spectators on shore and on board the steamers'.
Nares Papers, Correspondence 1867-1877, Memorandum to the officers and ships' company, HMS Alert at Floeberg Beach, from Captain George Nares, 16 June 1876.
The site was initially visited by British explorer George Nares, who overwintered at Discovery Harbor in 1875-76, as part of the British Arctic Expedition (Dick, 2001).
The legacies of these two expeditions, along with earlier visits by George Nares aboard HMS Discovery during the British Arctic Expedition (1875) and later stopovers by explorers like Godfred Hansen (1919), have left behind a great deal of material culture.
At this site, members of the British Arctic Expedition under the command of George Nares had discovered seams of coal during their wintering in the area between 1875 and 1876.
During the British Arctic Expedition, Sir George Nares had brought his two ships, HMS Alert and HMS Discovery, through the Kane Basin and Kennedy Channel to northern Ellesmere Island and the edge of the Polar Basin.
Edward Lawton Moss, accompanying Captain George Nares and other members of the British Arctic Expedition, climbed to the top of the southern plateau of Washington Irving Island off the entrance to Dobbin Bay on the east coast of Ellesmere Island.
The author has provided the most succinct account yet of these early explorations, covering the fine seamanship of Edward Inglefield, Elisha Kent Kane, Isaac Israel Hayes, Charles Francis Hall, and Sir George Nares.