Perle, George

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Perle, George

(1915–  ) composer, theorist; born in Bayonne, N.J. After musical studies in Chicago and at New York University, he taught at several schools before settling at Queens College (1961–84). He was a leading exponent and theorist of serial composition, his books including Serial Composition and Atonality (5th ed. 1982), his compositions including three symphonies and much chamber music.
References in periodicals archive ?
George Perle, String Quartets 2, 5, & 8, and Molto Adagio
INSTITUTIONALIZED FORGETTING ABOUT the scope of the Trotskyist experience in the United States was on display in every venue following the deaths of Peter Rafael Bloch (1921-2008), an authority on Puerto Rican artistic culture, and George Perle (born George Perlman, 1915-2009), a Pulitzer Prize-winning music theorist and composer once married to the sculptress and painter Laura Slobe (1909-58).
The winners were selected by a committee of Academy members: Jack Beeson, chair, Samuel Adler, Andrew Imbrie, Ezra Laderman, George Perle, Ned Rorem, Joan Tower and George Walker.
Consider Benjamin Boretz's review of Serial Composition and Atonality: An Introduction to the Music of Schoenberg, Berg, and Webern by George Perle (Perspectives of New Music 1 [spring 1963]: 125-36), or Karl Kohn's review of the performance of Richard Swift's Concerto for Piano with Chamber Ensemble, op.
As George Perle puts it, "on the one hand, an extraordinary intensity of feeling, and on the other, an unprecedented abstraction and rigor in the musical design, in the working out of musical ideas, and in the very shape of the themes"
George Perle is a distinguished composer and a renowned authority on the music of the so-called Second Viennese School, namely Schoenberg, Berg, and Webern.
George Perle is the obvious person to give us the definitive study of Berg's Lyric Suite: it was he who discovered the annotated score that, in revealing Berg's passion for Hanna Fuchs-Robettin, sister of Franz Werfel and sister-in-law of Alma Mahler, changed the face of Berg studies.
On the brighter side, it was a season of retrospectives for two septuagenarians, George Perle and Milton Babbitt, both enjoying continued productivity and the eloquent advocacy of gifted younger performers.
Except for articles by Alexander Goehr, George Perle, Christian Martin Schmidt, and Dieter Schnebel, there has been little work on the music of the last decade of Schoenberg's life, especially the late tonal works.
Similarly, on the basis of a programme note for the 1982-3 Bremen opera season, he praises his pupil Peter Petersen for 'pleading for a number of years on behalf of the three-act version, not least on the grounds of the extraordinary symmetrical correspondence between Act I and Act III', without anywhere mentioning that George Perle had demonstrated this necessity in 1964 and had continued to argue the case for a complete three-act version of the opera for nearly twenty years before Petersen's programme note appeared.
The writing is directed at the specialist musician, but it avoids obscure theoretical jargon in favor of concepts that are by now reasonably well known - set theory from the writings of Allen Forte, interval cycles advanced by George Perle, "creeping chromaticism" of Mark DeVoto, developing variations of Arnold Schoenberg and a host of other writers, and the musical semantics of Constantin Floros.
In the preface to his monograph on Alban Berg's Lyric Suite (1926), George Perle documents his own relationship with the work and describes how it influenced his compositional style and published writings.