George Washington Carver National Monument


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See also: National Parks and Monuments (table)National Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.

George Washington Carver National Monument:

see National Parks and MonumentsNational Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (table).

George Washington Carver National Monument

Address:5646 Carver Rd
Diamond, MO 64840

Phone:417-325-4151
Fax:417-325-4231
Web: www.nps.gov/gwca/
Size: 210 acres.
Established: Authorized on July 14, 1943.
Location:2 miles west of Diamond, Missouri, on Highway V, then south 0.5 miles on Carver Road.
Facilities:Picnic area, rest rooms (é), visitor center (é), museum/exhibit, self-guided tour/trail.
Activities:Hiking, guided tours and programs.
Special Features:The birthplace and childhood home of George Washington Carver, African-American agronomist, educator, and humanitarian, include a museum, Discovery Center, a trail passing the birthplace site, Boy Carver statue, restored 1881 Moses Carver House, and the Carver family cemetery.

See other parks in Missouri.
References in periodicals archive ?
A qualitative analysis was conducted on ten randomly-selected students who participated in the formal educational program at the George Washington Carver National Monument. Students who participated in the program were interviewed at least 12 months following the field trip to analyze recollection.
The open-ended and unstructured interviews began with the following statement: "Can you tell me what you remember about the field trip to George Washington Carver National Monument?" Subsequent statements or questions represented attempts to obtain clarification or elaboration regarding the students' experiences.
When asked about those experiences, one-year later, students were able to discuss important details such as, "Okay, so we went to George Washington Carver National Monument and like we walked around and saw his house and stuff.

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