George Wythe


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George Wythe
BirthplaceChesterville, Elizabeth City County, Virginia
Died
Known for signer of the United States Declaration of Independence

Wythe, George

(wĭth), 1726–1806, American lawyer, signer of the Declaration of Independence, b. Elizabeth City co., Va. Admitted to the bar in 1746, Wythe was a member (1754–55, 1758–68) and clerk (1769–75) of the house of burgesses. An opponent of British colonial policy, he drafted a remonstrance against the Stamp Act (1765) and was a delegate to the Continental Congress (1775–76). Wythe, aided by Thomas Jefferson and Edmund Pendleton, revised (1776) the laws of Virginia, and was influential in getting Virginia to ratify the Constitution. Perhaps his greatest contribution was as professor of law (1779–90) at the College of William and Mary; his teachings influenced many, including John Marshall, Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, and Henry Clay. Wythe was one of the greatest early U.S. lawyers. He served as judge (1778–88) in the Virginia chancery court and as sole chancellor (1788–1801).
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Wythe, George

(1726–1806) judge, law educator; born in Hampton, Va. He served as the colony of Virginia's attorney general and in the House of Burgesses, but he opposed Britain's Stamp Act (1764) and was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. He was sole justice of Virginia's High Court (1789–1801). He defended judicial review, and at the College of William and Mary, he was the first professor of law in the United States (1779–90), teaching John Marshall, James Monroe, Henry Clay, and others who would become influential lawyers and government officials. He died from poisoning by a grandnephew seeking to secure a legacy.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jefferson and Pendleton soon worked together on legal issues when they were elected to the committee for "A General Revisal of the Laws" of Virginia with George Wythe, George Mason, and Thomas Ludwell Lee.
Especially if it requires no embrace of Nietzsche's high-hearted view of philosophy, such that one feels that life is better for him having lived and reading him one notices one has grown wings and ears.--Michael Platt, George Wythe University.
But I'll bet you've never heard of George Wythe (with).
A former cop and graduate of George Wythe University--an unaccredited institution in Cedar City, Utah, founded by Oliver DeMille, a Skousen protege--he teaches with NCCS president Earl Taylor at the Heritage Academy charter school in Mesa, where he hones his material on formerly homeschooled high schoolers.
I am murdered; George Wythe, Thomas Jefferson, and the killing that shocked a new nation.
These men were recipients of a lifetime of mentorship by George Wythe, whose association with William and Mary ranged from serving as its burgess, then on its board of visitors, and then as a member of its faculty as "America's first law professor." Wythe's mentorship was an important influence in early America--as young men, future President Jefferson, future Chief Justice Marshall, and future Speaker of the House Henry Clay all studied under him.
(3) Jefferson also recruited his own beloved law teacher, George Wythe, to breathe life into the new school, beginning the next month.
The Founding Fathers had their preceptors, like George Wythe, who instilled in them the doctrines of liberty, and subsequent generations were the beneficiaries of a small-town, one-room-schoolhouse, family-centered culture that both furnished a proper education and instilled values that perpetuated and strengthened our civilization.
Our tradition began in 1779, when George Wythe was appointed a professor of law in the College of William and Mary.
DEBORAH SMITH of the George Wythe High School in Richmond, Va., is the top-ranked student in her class.
To see Colonial-style governing and living at its restored best, head for the Governor's Palace, the Capitol, the George Wythe House, the Peyton Randolph House and Raleigh Tavern.