George and Martha


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George and Martha

as an imaginary compensation for their childlessness, pretend they have a son, who would now be twenty-one. [Am. Drama: Edward Albee Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? in On Stage, 447]
References in periodicals archive ?
George and Martha Sutherland married in 1925, but two years later were separated, leading to them both living in lodging houses; George in Wilton Street, Martha in Soho Street.
As George and Martha go toe to toe in a spiral of mutual destruction a young couple, new to the area, get embroiled in their vile behaviour.
George and Martha face off as one of theatre's most notoriously dysfunctional couples in this hilarious and harrowing masterpiece.
But it is George and Martha who take the evening to its lower depths.
In the non-stop game of power in which George and Martha collaborate, Martha shouts, orders, humiliates her husband, pokes fun at him and constantly accuses him of knowing nothing.
She views the jokes and the pranks as a bond between George and Martha, a source of connection and mutual engagement (2010: 244).
GEORGE AND MARTHA ONE MORE TIME (9780547144238) offers two stories in an easy reader chapter book: THE SCARY MOVIE, where Martha is viewing her first scary film with friend George, and THE SECRET CLUB, where George wants his own club apart from Martha.
Nick tries to play the game but is way out of his depth in the vicious warfare the marriage of George and Martha has become, while sweet Honey has her own secret hidden at the bottom of a brandy glass.
Nick and Honey are bewildered by their sudden entrapment and often seem like convenient plot devices so that George and Martha can continue their verbal sparring.
The game is afoot from the opening moments when George and Martha stumble through the front door of their New England house.
Clearly George and Martha found peace and affection in one another, but they also had their share of tensions, to which Brady herself alludes--including George's ever-expanding commitment to public service and their increasingly divergent views on slavery.