Kartuli

(redirected from Georgian language)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Kartuli

 

(old name, lekurl), a Georgian paired folk dance. It is also known as the lezginka. The dance developed in Kartaliniia and Kakhetiia. The music is in 6/8 time. The dance is accompanied by an instrumental ensemble, made up of a dudka, a zurna, and a doli. The kartuli is danced in Paliashvili’s operas Daisi and Abesalom and Eteri.

References in periodicals archive ?
After 1996, except Georgian language and literature and other 1-2 subjects, preparation of teachers stopped.
The film is presented in Georgian language and is accompanied by subtitles in the Azerbaijani and Georgian languages.
Georgia also introduced a language law that required "a Georgian language test for entry into higher education," instituted national holidays, created military units comprised exclusively of native citizens, and promoted "the resettlement of Georgians in areas dominated by minorities." (12) Skirmishes between state forces and separatist militias began in late 1989.
The Georgian language film will be screened again on September 28.
It's a play of words in Georgian language: "I will die without you" means, that I will be dead without you, the two words "without you"--are pronounced the same as "building", and both can be understood as I can not live without that building.
It circulated in medieval Islamic Arab texts, was translated into the Georgian language and eventually into Greek, then Latin and a wide variety of medieval vernacular languages, including its appearance in The Golden Legend.
Triangulation of sources, including English, Russian and Georgian language documents and publications, contributes to eliminate the problem of biased data.
institution, the students-representatives of ethnic minority groups, shall learn Georgian Language; during the next four years - the
A distinctive feature of this project, which lasted for more than one year, was the absence of Georgian language package for MS SharePoint.
Filled with admiration for the work, she threw herself into study of Georgian language and in 1912 Rustaveli was brought to English readers in a prose translation.

Full browser ?