Georgics


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Related to Georgics: Eclogues, Bucolics

Georgics

Roman Vergil’s poetic statement set in context of agriculture. [Rom. Lit.: Benét, 389]
See: Farming
References in periodicals archive ?
These lines are embedded in the discussion on sheep breeding in the third book of Virgil's Georgics. The narrator in RB's poem compares the whiteness of the lambs' fleece to the whitest of fleeces with which Pan seduced Luna.
This summer, David Ferry's translation of The Georgics of Virgil provided a capacious opportunity to consider Time.
(2.) Jacques Dellile's translation of Virgil's Georgics (1769) enjoyed immediate public acclaim and numbered among its admirers Voltaire and Saint-Beuve.
The Georgics continues an ancient tradition of agricultural poetry that focuses on, among other things, the unremitting nature of farm labor: "[m]oving in great circles," Virgil writes, "work revisits the farmer as the year wheels around in its own tracks" (redit agricolis labor actus in orbem/atque in se sua per vestigia volvitur annus).
(17) Notably absent from this genealogy, for understandable reasons of geography and circulation, are the British-American staple colony georgics discussed in David Shields's Oracles of Empire (U of Chicago P, 1991), and Joyce Chaplin's An Anxious Pursuit (U of North Carolina P, 1993).
Virgil's Georgics, composed in the same era, also referenced the Scorpion's Claws while putting Libra to work on behalf of imperial authority.
But the president of the panel of judges, Georgics Efstathiou, said: "All the proceedings have shown that the defendants are aviation enthusiasts.
Darcy's character, shown in these passages, marks Austen's serious pastoral as groundbreaking in the same way, at roughly the same time as Wordsworth's: both incorporate pastorals' sister form, georgics, which existed alongside each other since Vergil's composition of the Eclogues and Georgics.
The ambiguities surrounding Turnus' character and motivation can be further clarified in the light of the poet's handling elsewhere in the Aeneid, and in the Eclogues and Georgics, of passion and violence and the possibility (or impossibility) of transcending them.
More importantly, it will co-ordinate the conclusion of Book IV with the first book of Virgil's Georgics, a reference crucial to comprehending Gabriel's obedience in the episode.
This is the conceptual area which the volume of essays under review investigates, by means of analysis of farming manuals, advice for beekeepers, correspondence between horticulturalists, and (a rightly recurrent topic) the growing influence of Virgil's Georgics. If the title of the book, however, leads readers to expect an even chronological spread of subject-matter 'from the early sixteenth to the first half of the eighteenth century' (p.