Georgics


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Related to Georgics: Eclogues, Bucolics

Georgics

Roman Vergil’s poetic statement set in context of agriculture. [Rom. Lit.: Benét, 389]
See: Farming
References in periodicals archive ?
1 and 2, Dante undermines Virgil's poetic authority and his prophetic powers, by undoing the symbolic bond that united his poetry to the political power of the House of Augustus, but this bond had already taken shape in Virgil's Georgics.
Original, complex and, allusive in his earlier works, Virgil in his epic poem the Georgics used farming the Italian countryside as a commentary on man and the forces of nature, as well as on the destruction and brutality of the civil wars of his own time.
15) While the shared themes of agricultural tools and labor indicate Berry's debts to the georgic mode and to The Georgics, the nuances he adds illuminate his differences from the Roman poet.
The literary form of the Horti, which imitates Virgil's Georgics in general, is analyzed as far as metrics, division into several books, extent, communicative situation, paratexts, prooemium, praeteritio of medicinal plants, aitiological epyllion, and sphragis are concerned (66-99).
The Georgics contain numerous puns on the word cultus, meaning "tilled," "cultivated," and "civilized.
2) To the present reader, at any rate, Pushkin's final lines allude to the conclusion of Virgil's Georgics (c.
In so doing, he simultaneously signals that he is now delivering what he had announced a decade earlier in Georgics 3:
Vergil mentions the river Euphrates only three times and all three instances are placed at very specific geometric points in his poems: in the Georgics at 1.
Understanding that Crevecoeur was steeped in the ancient classical tradition, therefore, enables us to recognize how this author repeatedly draws on two ancient classical texts, namely Vergil's Georgics and, in a subordinate way, the Aeneid, first, to frame his vision of Early American culture, and, second, to discover how Crevecoeur utilizes ancient classicism to critique and eventually dismantle the promising agrarian world that he initially constructs.
Beginning in spring and ending in winter, and centered on the year's important agricultural tasks (sowing, reaping, and harvesting), The Seasons' organization is modeled on Virgil's Georgics.
The book is divided into two sections: studying Virgil and the established partisan in the Aeneid and the partisan in the making in the Eclogues and Georgics.
She excludes from consideration the Eclogues and the Georgics and limits her scope to the reception of the Aeneid in the second half of the century; on the other hand, instead of focusing solely on epic poetry and theory, she goes beyond the field of narrative fiction and examines the role of the Aeneid in less obvious contexts, such as princely education and architectural debates.