geostrophic flow

geostrophic flow

[¦jē·ō¦sträf·ik ′flō]
(geophysics)
A form of gradient flow where the Coriolis force exactly balances the horizontal pressure force.
References in periodicals archive ?
This work analyzes the distribution of ichthyoplankton assemblages in the oceanic area of the southern region of the CC, off Baja California, and its relation with the geostrophic flow and the main environmental variables, based on the spatial comparative analysis of eggs, preflexion, flexion and postflexion larvae from two oceanographic surveys made during August 1999 and January 2000.
Castro, "Geostrophic flow conditions of the Brazil Current at 19[degrees]S," Ciencia Interamericana, vol.
We used CalCOFI data to model the likelihood of capturing Pacific mackerel larvae as a function of water temperature, zooplankton displacement volume, geostrophic flow (i.e., flow resulting from the pressure gradient force and Coriolis force), longitude, day of year, and the commercial-passenger-fishing-vessel (CPFV) index (a proxy for stock size).
This information becomes especially vital in Estonian nearshore waters where a complex interplay of the large-scale air flow with surface roughness and the presence of large-scale features such as the North Estonian klint cause substantial in homogeneity of average wind properties in different coastal areas [1,2], and where the mismatch of the orientation of coastline and the dominant direction of the geostrophic flow give rise to specific phenomena such as low-level jets along the coastline [3] (strong, apparently channelled easterly winds along the central part of the Gulf of Finland during certain seasons), or mismatch between directions of the most frequent and strongest winds [2].
Considering wide applications of Navier-Stokes equation, including for climatic modelling and prediction (albeit in simplified form called "geostrophic flow" [9]), one can expect that simpler expression of Navier-Stokes equation will be found useful.
Such boundary layers, or similar ones, are required to connect principally geostrophic flow in the interior of the fluid to horizontal boundaries where conditions like a prescribed horizontal stress, or no-slip on a solid bottom, are given.
As mentioned in section 3.4, the mean flow direction around the EIP is predominantly westward due to the propagation of mesoscale eddies, which have a higher mean speed than the mean geostrophic flow heading east.
We welcome the interesting recent paper by Haine and Cherian (2013, hereafter HC13), which introduced a physical analogy between the motion of a mechanical gyroscope and two geophysical flow phenomena that occur in the rotating shallow-water (RSW) equations: namely, geostrophic flow and inertial oscillations.